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Treatment of tinea capitis caused by Microsporum ferrugineum with itraconazole.
J Med Assoc Thai. 2005 Nov; 88 Suppl 8:S72-9.JM

Abstract

A prospective, non-randomized, open clinical trial was conducted to determine the efficacy of itraconazole for treatment of Microsporum ferrugineum tinea capitis. Itraconazole capsules were given every day in continuous group and every day for 1 week on and 3-week off in pulse therapy group. Concomitant topical therapy with 2% ketoconazole shampoo was used daily. Clinical evaluation consisted of assessing the degree of hair loss, scaling, erythema, pustule, and crust. In both groups, the treatment was stopped when the clinical signs of inflammation had resolved and the mycological examination had become negative or at week 12. There were 81 patients consisted of 49 boys and 32 girls enrolled and average dose of itraconazole was 4.5 mg/kg/day. During the 16-week study period (with 4-week follow-up visit) the overall clinical severity score decreased every visit (p < 0.001). The improvement of the scores showed no statistical difference between both groups. The cumulative cure rate using combined clinical and mycological cure at week 16 in patients treated with continuous and pulse regimen was 54.3% (19/35) and 37.0% (17/46), respectively. The cumulative percentage of all cure rates including clinical cure, mycological cure and combined clinical and mycological cure of the continuous group was significantly higher than in the pulse therapy group (p < 0.001). The superior efficacy of the continuous therapy group was observed after week 8. The cumulative cure rate increased with the longer treatment duration but decreased with the larger infected area involvement (p = 0.001). All patients who were not cured showed improvement. There was no significant adverse effect. The higher dosage or the longer treatment duration of itraconazole may be required for treatment of tinea capitis from M. ferrugineum to achieve more cure rate.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700, Thailand. siwws@mahidol.ac.thNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16856430

Citation

Wisuthsarewong, Wanee, and Angkana Chaiprasert. "Treatment of Tinea Capitis Caused By Microsporum Ferrugineum With Itraconazole." Journal of the Medical Association of Thailand = Chotmaihet Thangphaet, vol. 88 Suppl 8, 2005, pp. S72-9.
Wisuthsarewong W, Chaiprasert A. Treatment of tinea capitis caused by Microsporum ferrugineum with itraconazole. J Med Assoc Thai. 2005;88 Suppl 8:S72-9.
Wisuthsarewong, W., & Chaiprasert, A. (2005). Treatment of tinea capitis caused by Microsporum ferrugineum with itraconazole. Journal of the Medical Association of Thailand = Chotmaihet Thangphaet, 88 Suppl 8, S72-9.
Wisuthsarewong W, Chaiprasert A. Treatment of Tinea Capitis Caused By Microsporum Ferrugineum With Itraconazole. J Med Assoc Thai. 2005;88 Suppl 8:S72-9. PubMed PMID: 16856430.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Treatment of tinea capitis caused by Microsporum ferrugineum with itraconazole. AU - Wisuthsarewong,Wanee, AU - Chaiprasert,Angkana, PY - 2006/7/22/pubmed PY - 2006/8/23/medline PY - 2006/7/22/entrez SP - S72 EP - 9 JF - Journal of the Medical Association of Thailand = Chotmaihet thangphaet JO - J Med Assoc Thai VL - 88 Suppl 8 N2 - A prospective, non-randomized, open clinical trial was conducted to determine the efficacy of itraconazole for treatment of Microsporum ferrugineum tinea capitis. Itraconazole capsules were given every day in continuous group and every day for 1 week on and 3-week off in pulse therapy group. Concomitant topical therapy with 2% ketoconazole shampoo was used daily. Clinical evaluation consisted of assessing the degree of hair loss, scaling, erythema, pustule, and crust. In both groups, the treatment was stopped when the clinical signs of inflammation had resolved and the mycological examination had become negative or at week 12. There were 81 patients consisted of 49 boys and 32 girls enrolled and average dose of itraconazole was 4.5 mg/kg/day. During the 16-week study period (with 4-week follow-up visit) the overall clinical severity score decreased every visit (p < 0.001). The improvement of the scores showed no statistical difference between both groups. The cumulative cure rate using combined clinical and mycological cure at week 16 in patients treated with continuous and pulse regimen was 54.3% (19/35) and 37.0% (17/46), respectively. The cumulative percentage of all cure rates including clinical cure, mycological cure and combined clinical and mycological cure of the continuous group was significantly higher than in the pulse therapy group (p < 0.001). The superior efficacy of the continuous therapy group was observed after week 8. The cumulative cure rate increased with the longer treatment duration but decreased with the larger infected area involvement (p = 0.001). All patients who were not cured showed improvement. There was no significant adverse effect. The higher dosage or the longer treatment duration of itraconazole may be required for treatment of tinea capitis from M. ferrugineum to achieve more cure rate. SN - 0125-2208 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16856430/Treatment_of_tinea_capitis_caused_by_Microsporum_ferrugineum_with_itraconazole_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -