Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Injury rates, risk factors, and mechanisms of injury in minor hockey.
Am J Sports Med 2006; 34(12):1960-9AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Hockey is one of the top sports for participation in youth in Canada. There are limited data on the epidemiology of injury in youth hockey.

PURPOSE

Through implementation and validation of an injury surveillance system, youth ice hockey injury rates, risk factors, and mechanisms of injury will be examined.

STUDY DESIGN

Descriptive epidemiology study.

METHODS

During the 2004-2005 season in minor hockey in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, 71 hockey teams (N = 986) were studied, including teams from each age group (Atom, 9/10 years; Pee Wee, 11/12 years; Bantam, 13/14 years; Midget, 15/16 years) and division of play (7-10 divisions per age group). A certified athletic therapist or candidate did weekly assessments of any identified hockey injury. Injury definition included any injury occurring during the regular hockey season that required medical attention, removal from a session, or missing a subsequent session.

RESULTS

Of the 986 participating players, 216 players sustained a total of 296 injuries in the 2004-2005 season. The overall injury rate was 30.02 injuries per 100 players per season (95% confidence interval, 27.17-32.99) or 4.13 injuries per 1000 player hours (95% confidence interval, 3.67-4.62). Forty-five percent of all injuries occurred during body checking. Compared with the youngest age group, Atom, the risk of injury was greater in Pee Wee (relative risk, 2.97; 95% confidence interval, 1.63-5.8), Bantam (relative risk, 3.72; 95% confidence interval, 2.08-7.14), and Midget (relative risk, 5.43; 95% confidence interval, 3.14-10.17) leagues. The risk of injury in Pee Wee was greatest in the most elite divisions (relative risk, 2.45; 95% confidence interval, 1.15-5.81). Concussion, shoulder sprain/dislocation, and knee sprain were the most common injuries.

CONCLUSION

Significant differences in injury rates were found by age and division of play. The public health significance of body checking injury in minor hockey is great. Future research will include expansion of surveillance to further examine body checking injuries and prevention strategies in minor hockey.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Sport Medicine Centre, Roger Jackson Centre for Health and Wellness Research, Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. caemery@ucalgary.caNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16861577

Citation

Emery, Carolyn A., and Willem H. Meeuwisse. "Injury Rates, Risk Factors, and Mechanisms of Injury in Minor Hockey." The American Journal of Sports Medicine, vol. 34, no. 12, 2006, pp. 1960-9.
Emery CA, Meeuwisse WH. Injury rates, risk factors, and mechanisms of injury in minor hockey. Am J Sports Med. 2006;34(12):1960-9.
Emery, C. A., & Meeuwisse, W. H. (2006). Injury rates, risk factors, and mechanisms of injury in minor hockey. The American Journal of Sports Medicine, 34(12), pp. 1960-9.
Emery CA, Meeuwisse WH. Injury Rates, Risk Factors, and Mechanisms of Injury in Minor Hockey. Am J Sports Med. 2006;34(12):1960-9. PubMed PMID: 16861577.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Injury rates, risk factors, and mechanisms of injury in minor hockey. AU - Emery,Carolyn A, AU - Meeuwisse,Willem H, Y1 - 2006/07/21/ PY - 2006/7/25/pubmed PY - 2007/2/7/medline PY - 2006/7/25/entrez SP - 1960 EP - 9 JF - The American journal of sports medicine JO - Am J Sports Med VL - 34 IS - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND: Hockey is one of the top sports for participation in youth in Canada. There are limited data on the epidemiology of injury in youth hockey. PURPOSE: Through implementation and validation of an injury surveillance system, youth ice hockey injury rates, risk factors, and mechanisms of injury will be examined. STUDY DESIGN: Descriptive epidemiology study. METHODS: During the 2004-2005 season in minor hockey in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, 71 hockey teams (N = 986) were studied, including teams from each age group (Atom, 9/10 years; Pee Wee, 11/12 years; Bantam, 13/14 years; Midget, 15/16 years) and division of play (7-10 divisions per age group). A certified athletic therapist or candidate did weekly assessments of any identified hockey injury. Injury definition included any injury occurring during the regular hockey season that required medical attention, removal from a session, or missing a subsequent session. RESULTS: Of the 986 participating players, 216 players sustained a total of 296 injuries in the 2004-2005 season. The overall injury rate was 30.02 injuries per 100 players per season (95% confidence interval, 27.17-32.99) or 4.13 injuries per 1000 player hours (95% confidence interval, 3.67-4.62). Forty-five percent of all injuries occurred during body checking. Compared with the youngest age group, Atom, the risk of injury was greater in Pee Wee (relative risk, 2.97; 95% confidence interval, 1.63-5.8), Bantam (relative risk, 3.72; 95% confidence interval, 2.08-7.14), and Midget (relative risk, 5.43; 95% confidence interval, 3.14-10.17) leagues. The risk of injury in Pee Wee was greatest in the most elite divisions (relative risk, 2.45; 95% confidence interval, 1.15-5.81). Concussion, shoulder sprain/dislocation, and knee sprain were the most common injuries. CONCLUSION: Significant differences in injury rates were found by age and division of play. The public health significance of body checking injury in minor hockey is great. Future research will include expansion of surveillance to further examine body checking injuries and prevention strategies in minor hockey. SN - 0363-5465 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16861577/Injury_rates_risk_factors_and_mechanisms_of_injury_in_minor_hockey_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0363546506290061?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -