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Neurocognitive functioning in dually diagnosed middle aged and elderly patients with alcoholism and schizophrenia.
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2006 Aug; 21(8):711-8.IJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Alcohol abuse and dependence have important clinical implications for managing patients with schizophrenia. Alcoholism in schizophrenia patients can interfere with the course and prognosis of the schizophrenic illness.

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of the present study was to compare the cognitive status, symptom profile and quality of life of middle aged and older patients (>44 years old) with schizophrenia and alcohol abuse/dependence vs those without alcohol abuse/dependence. We initially hypothesized that more males in this age group with schizophrenia would exhibit alcoholism. We also examined the characteristics of the 45-54 year age group with those of the > or = 55 year old group and hypothesized that comorbidity with alcohol would be associated with worse cognition and quality of life in later life.

METHODS

Data were obtained from a database from the Center for Services and Interventions research at the University of California, San Diego. Patients had diagnoses of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Data collected included demographic characteristics, cognitive status (tested with the Mattis Dementia Rating Scale learning, the Figural and Story Memory Test of the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised and the California Verbal Learning Test [CVLT]). In addition, patients had undergone psychopathologic assessment and were screened for quality of life using the Quality of Well Being scale.

RESULTS

We demonstrated that the older aged patients with alcoholism had worse scores assessing cognition relative to the same aged group without alcoholism. In addition, they had worse cognitive scores relative to the younger group (45-54 year old) with alcoholism. There was no significant difference with regards to quality of life. In addition, more males than females exhibited alcoholism.

CONCLUSION

The results are consistent with the premise that the higher cognitive function in the younger schizophrenia patients with alcoholism appear to mask the effects of alcohol use on cognition at that age. However, for the older group of schizophrenia patients, the effects of alcohol use on neuropsychological functioning appear to be deleterious.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Cincinnati Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16862606

Citation

Mohamed, S, et al. "Neurocognitive Functioning in Dually Diagnosed Middle Aged and Elderly Patients With Alcoholism and Schizophrenia." International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, vol. 21, no. 8, 2006, pp. 711-8.
Mohamed S, Bondi MW, Kasckow JW, et al. Neurocognitive functioning in dually diagnosed middle aged and elderly patients with alcoholism and schizophrenia. Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2006;21(8):711-8.
Mohamed, S., Bondi, M. W., Kasckow, J. W., Golshan, S., & Jeste, D. V. (2006). Neurocognitive functioning in dually diagnosed middle aged and elderly patients with alcoholism and schizophrenia. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 21(8), 711-8.
Mohamed S, et al. Neurocognitive Functioning in Dually Diagnosed Middle Aged and Elderly Patients With Alcoholism and Schizophrenia. Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2006;21(8):711-8. PubMed PMID: 16862606.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Neurocognitive functioning in dually diagnosed middle aged and elderly patients with alcoholism and schizophrenia. AU - Mohamed,S, AU - Bondi,M W, AU - Kasckow,J W, AU - Golshan,S, AU - Jeste,D V, PY - 2006/7/25/pubmed PY - 2007/6/9/medline PY - 2006/7/25/entrez SP - 711 EP - 8 JF - International journal of geriatric psychiatry JO - Int J Geriatr Psychiatry VL - 21 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND: Alcohol abuse and dependence have important clinical implications for managing patients with schizophrenia. Alcoholism in schizophrenia patients can interfere with the course and prognosis of the schizophrenic illness. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the present study was to compare the cognitive status, symptom profile and quality of life of middle aged and older patients (>44 years old) with schizophrenia and alcohol abuse/dependence vs those without alcohol abuse/dependence. We initially hypothesized that more males in this age group with schizophrenia would exhibit alcoholism. We also examined the characteristics of the 45-54 year age group with those of the > or = 55 year old group and hypothesized that comorbidity with alcohol would be associated with worse cognition and quality of life in later life. METHODS: Data were obtained from a database from the Center for Services and Interventions research at the University of California, San Diego. Patients had diagnoses of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Data collected included demographic characteristics, cognitive status (tested with the Mattis Dementia Rating Scale learning, the Figural and Story Memory Test of the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised and the California Verbal Learning Test [CVLT]). In addition, patients had undergone psychopathologic assessment and were screened for quality of life using the Quality of Well Being scale. RESULTS: We demonstrated that the older aged patients with alcoholism had worse scores assessing cognition relative to the same aged group without alcoholism. In addition, they had worse cognitive scores relative to the younger group (45-54 year old) with alcoholism. There was no significant difference with regards to quality of life. In addition, more males than females exhibited alcoholism. CONCLUSION: The results are consistent with the premise that the higher cognitive function in the younger schizophrenia patients with alcoholism appear to mask the effects of alcohol use on cognition at that age. However, for the older group of schizophrenia patients, the effects of alcohol use on neuropsychological functioning appear to be deleterious. SN - 0885-6230 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16862606/Neurocognitive_functioning_in_dually_diagnosed_middle_aged_and_elderly_patients_with_alcoholism_and_schizophrenia_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -