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Liquefaction of lignocellulose at high-solids concentrations.
Biotechnol Bioeng. 2007 Apr 01; 96(5):862-70.BB

Abstract

To improve process economics of the lignocellulose to ethanol process a reactor system for enzymatic liquefaction and saccharification at high-solids concentrations was developed. The technology is based on free fall mixing employing a horizontally placed drum with a horizontal rotating shaft mounted with paddlers for mixing. Enzymatic liquefaction and saccharification of pretreated wheat straw was tested with up to 40% (w/w) initial DM. In less than 10 h, the structure of the material was changed from intact straw particles (length 1-5 cm) into a paste/liquid that could be pumped. Tests revealed no significant effect of mixing speed in the range 3.3-11.5 rpm on the glucose conversion after 24 h and ethanol yield after subsequent fermentation for 48 h. Low-power inputs for mixing are therefore possible. Liquefaction and saccharification for 96 h using an enzyme loading of 7 FPU/g.DM and 40% DM resulted in a glucose concentration of 86 g/kg. Experiments conducted at 2%-40% (w/w) initial DM revealed that cellulose and hemicellulose conversion decreased almost linearly with increasing DM. Performing the experiments as simultaneous saccharification and fermentation also revealed a decrease in ethanol yield at increasing initial DM. Saccharomyces cerevisiae was capable of fermenting hydrolysates up to 40% DM. The highest ethanol concentration, 48 g/kg, was obtained using 35% (w/w) DM. Liquefaction of biomass with this reactor system unlocks the possibility of 10% (w/w) ethanol in the fermentation broth in future lignocellulose to ethanol plants.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Forestry and Forest Products, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Rolighedsvej 23, DK-1958 Frederiksberg, Denmark. hnj@life.ku.dkNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16865734

Citation

Jørgensen, Henning, et al. "Liquefaction of Lignocellulose at High-solids Concentrations." Biotechnology and Bioengineering, vol. 96, no. 5, 2007, pp. 862-70.
Jørgensen H, Vibe-Pedersen J, Larsen J, et al. Liquefaction of lignocellulose at high-solids concentrations. Biotechnol Bioeng. 2007;96(5):862-70.
Jørgensen, H., Vibe-Pedersen, J., Larsen, J., & Felby, C. (2007). Liquefaction of lignocellulose at high-solids concentrations. Biotechnology and Bioengineering, 96(5), 862-70.
Jørgensen H, et al. Liquefaction of Lignocellulose at High-solids Concentrations. Biotechnol Bioeng. 2007 Apr 1;96(5):862-70. PubMed PMID: 16865734.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Liquefaction of lignocellulose at high-solids concentrations. AU - Jørgensen,Henning, AU - Vibe-Pedersen,Jakob, AU - Larsen,Jan, AU - Felby,Claus, PY - 2006/7/26/pubmed PY - 2007/5/11/medline PY - 2006/7/26/entrez SP - 862 EP - 70 JF - Biotechnology and bioengineering JO - Biotechnol Bioeng VL - 96 IS - 5 N2 - To improve process economics of the lignocellulose to ethanol process a reactor system for enzymatic liquefaction and saccharification at high-solids concentrations was developed. The technology is based on free fall mixing employing a horizontally placed drum with a horizontal rotating shaft mounted with paddlers for mixing. Enzymatic liquefaction and saccharification of pretreated wheat straw was tested with up to 40% (w/w) initial DM. In less than 10 h, the structure of the material was changed from intact straw particles (length 1-5 cm) into a paste/liquid that could be pumped. Tests revealed no significant effect of mixing speed in the range 3.3-11.5 rpm on the glucose conversion after 24 h and ethanol yield after subsequent fermentation for 48 h. Low-power inputs for mixing are therefore possible. Liquefaction and saccharification for 96 h using an enzyme loading of 7 FPU/g.DM and 40% DM resulted in a glucose concentration of 86 g/kg. Experiments conducted at 2%-40% (w/w) initial DM revealed that cellulose and hemicellulose conversion decreased almost linearly with increasing DM. Performing the experiments as simultaneous saccharification and fermentation also revealed a decrease in ethanol yield at increasing initial DM. Saccharomyces cerevisiae was capable of fermenting hydrolysates up to 40% DM. The highest ethanol concentration, 48 g/kg, was obtained using 35% (w/w) DM. Liquefaction of biomass with this reactor system unlocks the possibility of 10% (w/w) ethanol in the fermentation broth in future lignocellulose to ethanol plants. SN - 0006-3592 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16865734/Liquefaction_of_lignocellulose_at_high_solids_concentrations_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/bit.21115 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -