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Adolpho Lutz and the origins of medical entomology in Brazil.
Parassitologia 2005; 47(3-4):279-89P

Abstract

Adolpho Lutz (1855-1940) formed a bridge between the Bahian Tropicalist School and post-Mansonian medicine. Before taking over as head of the São Paulo Bacteriological Institute (1893), Lutz traveled through a variety of regions and delved into various disciplines. In the 1880s, he was already arguing that leprosy was transmitted by mosquitoes. Carbuncles, cholera, and typhoid fever were then the accepted models for investigating the etiology of infectious diseases. Following the discovery of how malaria was transmitted, attention turned to hematophagous diptera. Physicians, bacteriologists, zoologists, and veterinarians reshaped the network of actors involved in the 'hunt' for the agents and transmitters of diseases, as they began relying on analogies with malaria and yellow fever. Edwin Ray Lankester, director of the British Museum (Natural History), launched then a worldwide investigation into species that might be linked to human disease. The species described by Lutz and his proposed classification system were vital to Frederick Theobald's fundamental work in medical entomology, published in the early twentieth century. In 1908, Lutz brought with him to the Oswaldo Cruz Institute a remarkable quantity of research and experiments in all branches of the newly created "tropical medicine," devoted especially to entomology.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Casa de Oswaldo Cruz, Fiocruz, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. jbench@vol.com.br

Pub Type(s)

Biography
Historical Article
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16866033

Citation

Benchimol, J L.. "Adolpho Lutz and the Origins of Medical Entomology in Brazil." Parassitologia, vol. 47, no. 3-4, 2005, pp. 279-89.
Benchimol JL. Adolpho Lutz and the origins of medical entomology in Brazil. Parassitologia. 2005;47(3-4):279-89.
Benchimol, J. L. (2005). Adolpho Lutz and the origins of medical entomology in Brazil. Parassitologia, 47(3-4), pp. 279-89.
Benchimol JL. Adolpho Lutz and the Origins of Medical Entomology in Brazil. Parassitologia. 2005;47(3-4):279-89. PubMed PMID: 16866033.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Adolpho Lutz and the origins of medical entomology in Brazil. A1 - Benchimol,J L, PY - 2006/7/27/pubmed PY - 2006/10/5/medline PY - 2006/7/27/entrez SP - 279 EP - 89 JF - Parassitologia JO - Parassitologia VL - 47 IS - 3-4 N2 - Adolpho Lutz (1855-1940) formed a bridge between the Bahian Tropicalist School and post-Mansonian medicine. Before taking over as head of the São Paulo Bacteriological Institute (1893), Lutz traveled through a variety of regions and delved into various disciplines. In the 1880s, he was already arguing that leprosy was transmitted by mosquitoes. Carbuncles, cholera, and typhoid fever were then the accepted models for investigating the etiology of infectious diseases. Following the discovery of how malaria was transmitted, attention turned to hematophagous diptera. Physicians, bacteriologists, zoologists, and veterinarians reshaped the network of actors involved in the 'hunt' for the agents and transmitters of diseases, as they began relying on analogies with malaria and yellow fever. Edwin Ray Lankester, director of the British Museum (Natural History), launched then a worldwide investigation into species that might be linked to human disease. The species described by Lutz and his proposed classification system were vital to Frederick Theobald's fundamental work in medical entomology, published in the early twentieth century. In 1908, Lutz brought with him to the Oswaldo Cruz Institute a remarkable quantity of research and experiments in all branches of the newly created "tropical medicine," devoted especially to entomology. SN - 0048-2951 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16866033/Adolpho_Lutz_and_the_origins_of_medical_entomology_in_Brazil_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -