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Anxiolytic-like effect of cannabidiol in the rat Vogel conflict test.

Abstract

Cannabidiol (CBD) is a major constituent of the Cannabis sativa plant. It inhibits the anxiogenic activity of high doses of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and induces anxiolytic-like effects. However, the mechanisms underlying the actions of CBD are unknown. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to test the effects of CBD in the Vogel test, a widely used animal model of anxiety. In addition, it was verified if these effects would depend on benzodiazepine-receptor activation. After 24 h of water deprivation, male Wistar rats were subjected to an initial 3-min non-punished (pre-test) drinking session. This was followed by an additional 24-h period of water deprivation followed by a 3-min punished-licking session (test). Diazepam (3 mg/kg) or CBD (2.5, 5 or 10 mg/kg) were intraperitoneally injected 30 min before the test session. CBD (10 mg/kg) and diazepam had similar anticonflict effects, increasing the number of punished licks. The effect of diazepam, but not of CBD, was prevented by the benzodiazepine-receptor antagonist flumazenil (10 mg/kg). To exclude that the anticonflict effects were reflecting non-specific drug effects, we checked the effects of CBD on water consumption and nociceptive response. The drug did not interfere on the former variable in a non-punished test session. Moreover, contrary to morphine (5 mg/kg), CBD was ineffective in the tail-flick test. In conclusion, CBD induced an anticonflict effect not mediated by benzodiazepine receptors or by non-specific drug interference on nociceptive threshold or water consumption. These results reinforce the hypothesis that this cannabinoid has anxiolytic properties.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pharmacology, FMRP, University of São Paulo, Av Bandeirantes, 3900, 14049-900, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil. farmoreira@yahoo.com.brNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16876926

Citation

Moreira, Fabrício A., et al. "Anxiolytic-like Effect of Cannabidiol in the Rat Vogel Conflict Test." Progress in Neuro-psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry, vol. 30, no. 8, 2006, pp. 1466-71.
Moreira FA, Aguiar DC, Guimarães FS. Anxiolytic-like effect of cannabidiol in the rat Vogel conflict test. Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry. 2006;30(8):1466-71.
Moreira, F. A., Aguiar, D. C., & Guimarães, F. S. (2006). Anxiolytic-like effect of cannabidiol in the rat Vogel conflict test. Progress in Neuro-psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry, 30(8), pp. 1466-71.
Moreira FA, Aguiar DC, Guimarães FS. Anxiolytic-like Effect of Cannabidiol in the Rat Vogel Conflict Test. Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry. 2006 Dec 30;30(8):1466-71. PubMed PMID: 16876926.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Anxiolytic-like effect of cannabidiol in the rat Vogel conflict test. AU - Moreira,Fabrício A, AU - Aguiar,Daniele C, AU - Guimarães,Francisco S, Y1 - 2006/07/31/ PY - 2006/04/12/received PY - 2006/05/22/revised PY - 2006/06/11/accepted PY - 2006/8/1/pubmed PY - 2007/1/30/medline PY - 2006/8/1/entrez SP - 1466 EP - 71 JF - Progress in neuro-psychopharmacology & biological psychiatry JO - Prog. Neuropsychopharmacol. Biol. Psychiatry VL - 30 IS - 8 N2 - Cannabidiol (CBD) is a major constituent of the Cannabis sativa plant. It inhibits the anxiogenic activity of high doses of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and induces anxiolytic-like effects. However, the mechanisms underlying the actions of CBD are unknown. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to test the effects of CBD in the Vogel test, a widely used animal model of anxiety. In addition, it was verified if these effects would depend on benzodiazepine-receptor activation. After 24 h of water deprivation, male Wistar rats were subjected to an initial 3-min non-punished (pre-test) drinking session. This was followed by an additional 24-h period of water deprivation followed by a 3-min punished-licking session (test). Diazepam (3 mg/kg) or CBD (2.5, 5 or 10 mg/kg) were intraperitoneally injected 30 min before the test session. CBD (10 mg/kg) and diazepam had similar anticonflict effects, increasing the number of punished licks. The effect of diazepam, but not of CBD, was prevented by the benzodiazepine-receptor antagonist flumazenil (10 mg/kg). To exclude that the anticonflict effects were reflecting non-specific drug effects, we checked the effects of CBD on water consumption and nociceptive response. The drug did not interfere on the former variable in a non-punished test session. Moreover, contrary to morphine (5 mg/kg), CBD was ineffective in the tail-flick test. In conclusion, CBD induced an anticonflict effect not mediated by benzodiazepine receptors or by non-specific drug interference on nociceptive threshold or water consumption. These results reinforce the hypothesis that this cannabinoid has anxiolytic properties. SN - 0278-5846 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16876926/Anxiolytic_like_effect_of_cannabidiol_in_the_rat_Vogel_conflict_test_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0278-5846(06)00261-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -