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Asymmetry between salivary cortisol and alpha-amylase reactivity to stress: relation to aggressive behavior in adolescents.
Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2006 Sep; 31(8):976-87.P

Abstract

This study used a multiple physiological systems measurement approach to test the hypothesis that asymmetry between the major components of the psychobiology of stress is associated with atypical behavior in youth [Bauer, A.M., Quas, J.A., Boyce, W.T., 2002. Associations between physiological reactivity and children's behavior: advantages of a multisystem approach. J. Dev. Behav. Pediatr. 23, 102-113]. Adolescents (N=67; ages 10-14; 52% male) provided 2 saliva samples before, and 4 samples after, a modified Trier Social Stress Test (TSST; Kirschbaum, C., Pirke, K., Hellhammer, D.H., 1993. The "Trier Social Stress Test": a tool for investigating psychobiological stress responses in a laboratory setting. Neuropsychobiology 28, 76-81). Samples were assayed for cortisol (C) and alpha-amylase (A-A), a surrogate marker of sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity. Parents/guardians and adolescents reported on adolescents' aggressive behavior. Both salivary A-A and C increased in response to the TSST, with a peak response for A-A immediately post-TSST and for C 10 min post-TSST. A-A and C stress reactivity were estimated using area under the curve (AUC). Asymmetrical C and A-A reactivity accounted for 7% of the variance in parent-reported adolescent aggression. At lower levels of A-A reactivity, lower C reactivity corresponded to higher aggression ratings, but at high A-A reactivity levels, C reactivity was not related to aggression. These results support the hypothesis of Bauer et al. and underscore the importance of a multiple systems measurement approach in biosocial models of adolescent aggression.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University at Albany, State University of New York, Social Sciences 369, 1400 Washington Avenue, Albany, NY 12222, USA. egordis@albany.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16879926

Citation

Gordis, Elana B., et al. "Asymmetry Between Salivary Cortisol and Alpha-amylase Reactivity to Stress: Relation to Aggressive Behavior in Adolescents." Psychoneuroendocrinology, vol. 31, no. 8, 2006, pp. 976-87.
Gordis EB, Granger DA, Susman EJ, et al. Asymmetry between salivary cortisol and alpha-amylase reactivity to stress: relation to aggressive behavior in adolescents. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2006;31(8):976-87.
Gordis, E. B., Granger, D. A., Susman, E. J., & Trickett, P. K. (2006). Asymmetry between salivary cortisol and alpha-amylase reactivity to stress: relation to aggressive behavior in adolescents. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 31(8), 976-87.
Gordis EB, et al. Asymmetry Between Salivary Cortisol and Alpha-amylase Reactivity to Stress: Relation to Aggressive Behavior in Adolescents. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2006;31(8):976-87. PubMed PMID: 16879926.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Asymmetry between salivary cortisol and alpha-amylase reactivity to stress: relation to aggressive behavior in adolescents. AU - Gordis,Elana B, AU - Granger,Douglas A, AU - Susman,Elizabeth J, AU - Trickett,Penelope K, Y1 - 2006/08/01/ PY - 2005/11/29/received PY - 2006/03/19/revised PY - 2006/05/24/accepted PY - 2006/8/2/pubmed PY - 2006/10/13/medline PY - 2006/8/2/entrez SP - 976 EP - 87 JF - Psychoneuroendocrinology JO - Psychoneuroendocrinology VL - 31 IS - 8 N2 - This study used a multiple physiological systems measurement approach to test the hypothesis that asymmetry between the major components of the psychobiology of stress is associated with atypical behavior in youth [Bauer, A.M., Quas, J.A., Boyce, W.T., 2002. Associations between physiological reactivity and children's behavior: advantages of a multisystem approach. J. Dev. Behav. Pediatr. 23, 102-113]. Adolescents (N=67; ages 10-14; 52% male) provided 2 saliva samples before, and 4 samples after, a modified Trier Social Stress Test (TSST; Kirschbaum, C., Pirke, K., Hellhammer, D.H., 1993. The "Trier Social Stress Test": a tool for investigating psychobiological stress responses in a laboratory setting. Neuropsychobiology 28, 76-81). Samples were assayed for cortisol (C) and alpha-amylase (A-A), a surrogate marker of sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity. Parents/guardians and adolescents reported on adolescents' aggressive behavior. Both salivary A-A and C increased in response to the TSST, with a peak response for A-A immediately post-TSST and for C 10 min post-TSST. A-A and C stress reactivity were estimated using area under the curve (AUC). Asymmetrical C and A-A reactivity accounted for 7% of the variance in parent-reported adolescent aggression. At lower levels of A-A reactivity, lower C reactivity corresponded to higher aggression ratings, but at high A-A reactivity levels, C reactivity was not related to aggression. These results support the hypothesis of Bauer et al. and underscore the importance of a multiple systems measurement approach in biosocial models of adolescent aggression. SN - 0306-4530 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16879926/Asymmetry_between_salivary_cortisol_and_alpha_amylase_reactivity_to_stress:_relation_to_aggressive_behavior_in_adolescents_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0306-4530(06)00094-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -