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Bran and irritable bowel syndrome: the primary-care perspective.
Dig Liver Dis 2006; 38(10):737-40DL

Abstract

BACKGROUND

We have shown that bran exacerbates irritable bowel syndrome symptoms in a large proportion of secondary-care patients. However, it is unknown if this also happens in primary-care or whether a better response to bran occurs, leading to bran failures being selected for referral to the specialist.

AIMS

To assess the response to bran in primary-care irritable bowel syndrome comparing it to that obtained in secondary-care.

PATIENTS AND METHODS

One hundred consecutive primary-care irritable bowel syndrome patients were asked how bran or soluble fibre products affected their symptoms.

RESULTS

Bran improved symptoms in 27% of primary-care and 10% of secondary-care patients (p<0.01) and exacerbated symptoms in 22% of primary-care and 55% of secondary-care patients (p<0.001). Fifty-one percent of primary-care and 33% of secondary-care patients reported no change with bran. In primary-care, proprietary fibre led to improvement in 25%, deterioration in 19% and no change in 56% which was not significantly different to secondary-care.

CONCLUSION

Although not especially effective in primary-care irritable bowel syndrome patients, bran does not cause so many problems and is more helpful than in secondary-care. The effects of soluble fibre are similar in both primary-care and secondary-care. This study highlights the problem of extrapolating the response to treatment in irritable bowel syndrome from different care settings.

Authors+Show Affiliations

South Manchester University Hospitals, Manchester, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16880013

Citation

Miller, V, et al. "Bran and Irritable Bowel Syndrome: the Primary-care Perspective." Digestive and Liver Disease : Official Journal of the Italian Society of Gastroenterology and the Italian Association for the Study of the Liver, vol. 38, no. 10, 2006, pp. 737-40.
Miller V, Lea R, Agrawal A, et al. Bran and irritable bowel syndrome: the primary-care perspective. Dig Liver Dis. 2006;38(10):737-40.
Miller, V., Lea, R., Agrawal, A., & Whorwell, P. J. (2006). Bran and irritable bowel syndrome: the primary-care perspective. Digestive and Liver Disease : Official Journal of the Italian Society of Gastroenterology and the Italian Association for the Study of the Liver, 38(10), pp. 737-40.
Miller V, et al. Bran and Irritable Bowel Syndrome: the Primary-care Perspective. Dig Liver Dis. 2006;38(10):737-40. PubMed PMID: 16880013.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Bran and irritable bowel syndrome: the primary-care perspective. AU - Miller,V, AU - Lea,R, AU - Agrawal,A, AU - Whorwell,P J, Y1 - 2006/08/01/ PY - 2005/12/20/received PY - 2006/06/16/revised PY - 2006/06/19/accepted PY - 2006/8/2/pubmed PY - 2007/2/3/medline PY - 2006/8/2/entrez SP - 737 EP - 40 JF - Digestive and liver disease : official journal of the Italian Society of Gastroenterology and the Italian Association for the Study of the Liver JO - Dig Liver Dis VL - 38 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: We have shown that bran exacerbates irritable bowel syndrome symptoms in a large proportion of secondary-care patients. However, it is unknown if this also happens in primary-care or whether a better response to bran occurs, leading to bran failures being selected for referral to the specialist. AIMS: To assess the response to bran in primary-care irritable bowel syndrome comparing it to that obtained in secondary-care. PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred consecutive primary-care irritable bowel syndrome patients were asked how bran or soluble fibre products affected their symptoms. RESULTS: Bran improved symptoms in 27% of primary-care and 10% of secondary-care patients (p<0.01) and exacerbated symptoms in 22% of primary-care and 55% of secondary-care patients (p<0.001). Fifty-one percent of primary-care and 33% of secondary-care patients reported no change with bran. In primary-care, proprietary fibre led to improvement in 25%, deterioration in 19% and no change in 56% which was not significantly different to secondary-care. CONCLUSION: Although not especially effective in primary-care irritable bowel syndrome patients, bran does not cause so many problems and is more helpful than in secondary-care. The effects of soluble fibre are similar in both primary-care and secondary-care. This study highlights the problem of extrapolating the response to treatment in irritable bowel syndrome from different care settings. SN - 1590-8658 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16880013/Bran_and_irritable_bowel_syndrome:_the_primary_care_perspective_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1590-8658(06)00262-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -