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Incidence of pediatric traumatic brain injury and associated hospital resource utilization in the United States.
Pediatrics. 2006 Aug; 118(2):483-92.Ped

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The goal was to examine the influence of sociodemographic characteristics and health care system factors on the utilization of hospital resources by US children < or = 17 years of age with a diagnosis of traumatic brain injury.

METHODS

A retrospective analysis of data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids' Inpatient Database, from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2000, was performed. National estimates of traumatic brain injury-associated hospitalization rates and resource use were calculated with Kids' Inpatient Database sample weighting methods.

RESULTS

Of 2,516,833 encounters between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2000, 25,783 cases involved patients < or = 17 years of age with a recorded diagnosis of traumatic brain injury. On the basis of these data, there were an estimated 50,658 traumatic brain injury-associated hospitalizations among children < or = 17 years of age in the United States in 2000. The traumatic brain injury-associated hospitalization rate was 70 cases per 100,000 children < or = 17 years of age per year; 15- to 17-year-old patients had the highest hospitalization rate (125 cases per 100,000 children per year). Pediatric inpatients accrued more than $1 billion in total charges for traumatic brain injury-associated hospitalizations in this study. In the multivariate regression models, older age, Medicaid insurance status, and admission to any type of children's hospital were associated with a longer length of stay for pediatric traumatic brain injury-associated hospitalizations. Older age, longer length of stay, and in-hospital death predicted higher total charges for traumatic brain injury-associated hospitalizations.

CONCLUSION

Pediatric traumatic brain injury is a substantial contributor to the health resource burden in the United States, accounting for more than $1 billion in total hospital charges annually.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Injury Research and Policy, Columbus Children's Research Institute, Columbus Children's Hospital, 700 Children's Dr, Columbus, Ohio 43205, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16882799

Citation

Schneier, Andrew J., et al. "Incidence of Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury and Associated Hospital Resource Utilization in the United States." Pediatrics, vol. 118, no. 2, 2006, pp. 483-92.
Schneier AJ, Shields BJ, Hostetler SG, et al. Incidence of pediatric traumatic brain injury and associated hospital resource utilization in the United States. Pediatrics. 2006;118(2):483-92.
Schneier, A. J., Shields, B. J., Hostetler, S. G., Xiang, H., & Smith, G. A. (2006). Incidence of pediatric traumatic brain injury and associated hospital resource utilization in the United States. Pediatrics, 118(2), 483-92.
Schneier AJ, et al. Incidence of Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury and Associated Hospital Resource Utilization in the United States. Pediatrics. 2006;118(2):483-92. PubMed PMID: 16882799.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Incidence of pediatric traumatic brain injury and associated hospital resource utilization in the United States. AU - Schneier,Andrew J, AU - Shields,Brenda J, AU - Hostetler,Sarah Grim, AU - Xiang,Huiyun, AU - Smith,Gary A, PY - 2006/8/3/pubmed PY - 2006/9/12/medline PY - 2006/8/3/entrez SP - 483 EP - 92 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 118 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The goal was to examine the influence of sociodemographic characteristics and health care system factors on the utilization of hospital resources by US children < or = 17 years of age with a diagnosis of traumatic brain injury. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids' Inpatient Database, from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2000, was performed. National estimates of traumatic brain injury-associated hospitalization rates and resource use were calculated with Kids' Inpatient Database sample weighting methods. RESULTS: Of 2,516,833 encounters between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2000, 25,783 cases involved patients < or = 17 years of age with a recorded diagnosis of traumatic brain injury. On the basis of these data, there were an estimated 50,658 traumatic brain injury-associated hospitalizations among children < or = 17 years of age in the United States in 2000. The traumatic brain injury-associated hospitalization rate was 70 cases per 100,000 children < or = 17 years of age per year; 15- to 17-year-old patients had the highest hospitalization rate (125 cases per 100,000 children per year). Pediatric inpatients accrued more than $1 billion in total charges for traumatic brain injury-associated hospitalizations in this study. In the multivariate regression models, older age, Medicaid insurance status, and admission to any type of children's hospital were associated with a longer length of stay for pediatric traumatic brain injury-associated hospitalizations. Older age, longer length of stay, and in-hospital death predicted higher total charges for traumatic brain injury-associated hospitalizations. CONCLUSION: Pediatric traumatic brain injury is a substantial contributor to the health resource burden in the United States, accounting for more than $1 billion in total hospital charges annually. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16882799/Incidence_of_pediatric_traumatic_brain_injury_and_associated_hospital_resource_utilization_in_the_United_States_ L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=16882799 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -