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Undiagnosed and potentially lethal parasite infections among immigrants and refugees in Australia.
J Travel Med. 2006 Jul-Aug; 13(4):233-9.JT

Abstract

Intestinal parasite infections are a major cause of ill health in many resource-poor countries. This study compares the types and rates of these infections and their risk factors in recently arrived and long-term immigrants in Australia. Cross-sectional surveys of 127 East African and 234 Cambodian immigrants and refugees were undertaken in 2000 and 2002, respectively, to assess the burden of intestinal parasites and collect demographic information. Serum samples were assessed for eosinophilia and Strongyloides stercoralis and Schistosoma antibodies, and feces examined for ova, cysts, and parasites. Intestinal parasites were identified in 77/117 fecal samples from East African and in 25/204 samples collected from Cambodian participants. Eleven percent (14/124) of East Africans and 42% (97/230) of Cambodians had positive or equivocal serology for S stercoralis. Schistosoma serology was positive or equivocal in 15% (19/124) of East African participants. Potentially serious intestinal parasite infections are common among recent and longer term immigrants despite multiple visits to health care providers. Immigrants and refugees from high-risk countries would benefit from comprehensive health checks soon after resettlement.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3050, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16884406

Citation

Caruana, Sonia R., et al. "Undiagnosed and Potentially Lethal Parasite Infections Among Immigrants and Refugees in Australia." Journal of Travel Medicine, vol. 13, no. 4, 2006, pp. 233-9.
Caruana SR, Kelly HA, Ngeow JY, et al. Undiagnosed and potentially lethal parasite infections among immigrants and refugees in Australia. J Travel Med. 2006;13(4):233-9.
Caruana, S. R., Kelly, H. A., Ngeow, J. Y., Ryan, N. J., Bennett, C. M., Chea, L., Nuon, S., Bak, N., Skull, S. A., & Biggs, B. A. (2006). Undiagnosed and potentially lethal parasite infections among immigrants and refugees in Australia. Journal of Travel Medicine, 13(4), 233-9.
Caruana SR, et al. Undiagnosed and Potentially Lethal Parasite Infections Among Immigrants and Refugees in Australia. J Travel Med. 2006 Jul-Aug;13(4):233-9. PubMed PMID: 16884406.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Undiagnosed and potentially lethal parasite infections among immigrants and refugees in Australia. AU - Caruana,Sonia R, AU - Kelly,Heath A, AU - Ngeow,Joanne Y Y, AU - Ryan,Norbert J, AU - Bennett,Catherine M, AU - Chea,Ley, AU - Nuon,Sophy, AU - Bak,Narin, AU - Skull,Susan A, AU - Biggs,Beverley-Ann, PY - 2006/8/4/pubmed PY - 2006/12/9/medline PY - 2006/8/4/entrez SP - 233 EP - 9 JF - Journal of travel medicine JO - J Travel Med VL - 13 IS - 4 N2 - Intestinal parasite infections are a major cause of ill health in many resource-poor countries. This study compares the types and rates of these infections and their risk factors in recently arrived and long-term immigrants in Australia. Cross-sectional surveys of 127 East African and 234 Cambodian immigrants and refugees were undertaken in 2000 and 2002, respectively, to assess the burden of intestinal parasites and collect demographic information. Serum samples were assessed for eosinophilia and Strongyloides stercoralis and Schistosoma antibodies, and feces examined for ova, cysts, and parasites. Intestinal parasites were identified in 77/117 fecal samples from East African and in 25/204 samples collected from Cambodian participants. Eleven percent (14/124) of East Africans and 42% (97/230) of Cambodians had positive or equivocal serology for S stercoralis. Schistosoma serology was positive or equivocal in 15% (19/124) of East African participants. Potentially serious intestinal parasite infections are common among recent and longer term immigrants despite multiple visits to health care providers. Immigrants and refugees from high-risk countries would benefit from comprehensive health checks soon after resettlement. SN - 1195-1982 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16884406/Undiagnosed_and_potentially_lethal_parasite_infections_among_immigrants_and_refugees_in_Australia_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jtm/article-lookup/doi/10.1111/j.1708-8305.2006.00045.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -