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Clinical features and diagnosis of 42 travellers with cutaneous leishmaniasis.
Travel Med Infect Dis. 2006 Jan; 4(1):14-21.TM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Leishmania species that occur within different geographical areas may cause different clinical manifestations, virulence and drug sensitivity. Patients/Methods. All patients with a clinical diagnosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis seen at the Hospital for Tropical Diseases from 1997 to 2000 were identified and clinical details recorded onto a database, with emphasis on clinical presentation, risk factors, travel history and laboratory diagnosis.

RESULTS

Forty-two patients were identified, 23 of whom had travelled to New World and 19 to Old World countries. Clinical presentation typically consisted of a single nodule with ulceration. In 50% infection was caused by L. (Viannia) braziliensis. PCR was performed in specimens from 34 patients and species identification was possible in 32 cases (sensitivity 94%), the two PCR negative patients had amastigotes demonstrated by histology and culture. Patients were treated with established therapies. Seventy one percent were cured by treatment, 12% had a spontaneous cure, 7% were lost to follow-up and the remaining 10% required a second-line therapy. No relapses were reported during a mean follow-up period of 27 months.

CONCLUSIONS

Our study highlights the need for comprehensive investigations and the advantages of PCR in the diagnosis of patients with suspected leishmaniasis in non-endemic regions of the world.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Dermatology, Middlesex Hospital, Mortimer Street, London W1N 8AA, UK. juliascarisbrick@doctors.net.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16887720

Citation

Scarisbrick, J J., et al. "Clinical Features and Diagnosis of 42 Travellers With Cutaneous Leishmaniasis." Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease, vol. 4, no. 1, 2006, pp. 14-21.
Scarisbrick JJ, Chiodini PL, Watson J, et al. Clinical features and diagnosis of 42 travellers with cutaneous leishmaniasis. Travel Med Infect Dis. 2006;4(1):14-21.
Scarisbrick, J. J., Chiodini, P. L., Watson, J., Moody, A., Armstrong, M., Lockwood, D., Bryceson, A., & Vega-López, F. (2006). Clinical features and diagnosis of 42 travellers with cutaneous leishmaniasis. Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease, 4(1), 14-21.
Scarisbrick JJ, et al. Clinical Features and Diagnosis of 42 Travellers With Cutaneous Leishmaniasis. Travel Med Infect Dis. 2006;4(1):14-21. PubMed PMID: 16887720.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Clinical features and diagnosis of 42 travellers with cutaneous leishmaniasis. AU - Scarisbrick,J J, AU - Chiodini,P L, AU - Watson,J, AU - Moody,A, AU - Armstrong,M, AU - Lockwood,D, AU - Bryceson,A, AU - Vega-López,F, Y1 - 2005/01/07/ PY - 2004/09/16/received PY - 2004/10/13/accepted PY - 2006/8/5/pubmed PY - 2007/6/9/medline PY - 2006/8/5/entrez SP - 14 EP - 21 JF - Travel medicine and infectious disease JO - Travel Med Infect Dis VL - 4 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Leishmania species that occur within different geographical areas may cause different clinical manifestations, virulence and drug sensitivity. Patients/Methods. All patients with a clinical diagnosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis seen at the Hospital for Tropical Diseases from 1997 to 2000 were identified and clinical details recorded onto a database, with emphasis on clinical presentation, risk factors, travel history and laboratory diagnosis. RESULTS: Forty-two patients were identified, 23 of whom had travelled to New World and 19 to Old World countries. Clinical presentation typically consisted of a single nodule with ulceration. In 50% infection was caused by L. (Viannia) braziliensis. PCR was performed in specimens from 34 patients and species identification was possible in 32 cases (sensitivity 94%), the two PCR negative patients had amastigotes demonstrated by histology and culture. Patients were treated with established therapies. Seventy one percent were cured by treatment, 12% had a spontaneous cure, 7% were lost to follow-up and the remaining 10% required a second-line therapy. No relapses were reported during a mean follow-up period of 27 months. CONCLUSIONS: Our study highlights the need for comprehensive investigations and the advantages of PCR in the diagnosis of patients with suspected leishmaniasis in non-endemic regions of the world. SN - 1477-8939 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16887720/Clinical_features_and_diagnosis_of_42_travellers_with_cutaneous_leishmaniasis_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1477-8939(04)00123-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -