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Experimental gastrointestinal allergy enhances pulmonary responses to specific and unrelated allergens.
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2006 Aug; 118(2):420-7.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Gastrointestinal allergy often precedes or coexists with respiratory allergy.

OBJECTIVE

We hypothesized that established experimental gastrointestinal allergy would prime for the development of allergic respiratory responses.

METHODS

BALB/c mice were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) in the presence of aluminum potassium sulfate and then subjected to intragastric saline or OVA challenges. After the development of allergen-induced gastrointestinal allergy, mice were intranasally exposed to either saline, OVA, or a neoaeroallergen house dust mite (HDM) extract. Airway inflammation (eg, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cellularity, cytokine levels, and OVA-specific antibody levels) and airway responsiveness to methacholine exposure were assessed after intranasal allergen exposure.

RESULTS

A single intranasal exposure to OVA induced significantly more airway inflammation in intragastric OVA-challenged mice compared with that seen in intragastric saline-treated mice. Kinetic analysis revealed that the observed amplification of lung inflammation was sustained for up to 12 days after the last intragastric OVA challenge after resolution of blood eosinophilia. When mice with gastrointestinal allergy were repeatedly challenged with HDM in the respiratory tract, they experienced enhanced airway inflammation, including bronchoalveolar lavage fluid eosinophilia and increased IL-13 levels.

CONCLUSION

Taken together, our results demonstrate that OVA-induced gastrointestinal allergy enhances not only allergic airway responses to OVA but also to HDM, an unrelated aeroallergen.

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS

Experimental gastrointestinal allergy primes for responses to allergens in the respiratory tract, enhancing antigen-specific antibody and T(H)2 cytokine production, airway inflammation, and airway hyperresponsiveness.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16890767

Citation

Brandt, Eric B., et al. "Experimental Gastrointestinal Allergy Enhances Pulmonary Responses to Specific and Unrelated Allergens." The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 118, no. 2, 2006, pp. 420-7.
Brandt EB, Scribner TA, Akei HS, et al. Experimental gastrointestinal allergy enhances pulmonary responses to specific and unrelated allergens. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2006;118(2):420-7.
Brandt, E. B., Scribner, T. A., Akei, H. S., & Rothenberg, M. E. (2006). Experimental gastrointestinal allergy enhances pulmonary responses to specific and unrelated allergens. The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 118(2), 420-7.
Brandt EB, et al. Experimental Gastrointestinal Allergy Enhances Pulmonary Responses to Specific and Unrelated Allergens. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2006;118(2):420-7. PubMed PMID: 16890767.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Experimental gastrointestinal allergy enhances pulmonary responses to specific and unrelated allergens. AU - Brandt,Eric B, AU - Scribner,Troy A, AU - Akei,Hiroko Saito, AU - Rothenberg,Marc E, PY - 2006/05/11/received PY - 2006/06/12/revised PY - 2006/06/13/accepted PY - 2006/8/8/pubmed PY - 2006/9/9/medline PY - 2006/8/8/entrez SP - 420 EP - 7 JF - The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology JO - J Allergy Clin Immunol VL - 118 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Gastrointestinal allergy often precedes or coexists with respiratory allergy. OBJECTIVE: We hypothesized that established experimental gastrointestinal allergy would prime for the development of allergic respiratory responses. METHODS: BALB/c mice were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) in the presence of aluminum potassium sulfate and then subjected to intragastric saline or OVA challenges. After the development of allergen-induced gastrointestinal allergy, mice were intranasally exposed to either saline, OVA, or a neoaeroallergen house dust mite (HDM) extract. Airway inflammation (eg, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cellularity, cytokine levels, and OVA-specific antibody levels) and airway responsiveness to methacholine exposure were assessed after intranasal allergen exposure. RESULTS: A single intranasal exposure to OVA induced significantly more airway inflammation in intragastric OVA-challenged mice compared with that seen in intragastric saline-treated mice. Kinetic analysis revealed that the observed amplification of lung inflammation was sustained for up to 12 days after the last intragastric OVA challenge after resolution of blood eosinophilia. When mice with gastrointestinal allergy were repeatedly challenged with HDM in the respiratory tract, they experienced enhanced airway inflammation, including bronchoalveolar lavage fluid eosinophilia and increased IL-13 levels. CONCLUSION: Taken together, our results demonstrate that OVA-induced gastrointestinal allergy enhances not only allergic airway responses to OVA but also to HDM, an unrelated aeroallergen. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Experimental gastrointestinal allergy primes for responses to allergens in the respiratory tract, enhancing antigen-specific antibody and T(H)2 cytokine production, airway inflammation, and airway hyperresponsiveness. SN - 0091-6749 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16890767/Experimental_gastrointestinal_allergy_enhances_pulmonary_responses_to_specific_and_unrelated_allergens_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -