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Psychosocial outcomes at 15 years of children with a preschool history of speech-language impairment.
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2006 Aug; 47(8):759-65.JC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Evidence suggests there is a heightened risk of psychiatric disorder in children with speech-language impairments. However, not all forms of language impairment are strongly associated with psychosocial difficulty, and some psychiatric disorders (e.g., attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)) are more prevalent than others in language-impaired populations. The present study assessed the psychosocial adjustment in adolescence of young people with history of speech-language impairment, and investigated specific relationships between language deficits and psychiatric disorders.

METHODS

Seventy-one young people (aged 15-16 years) with a preschool history of speech-language impairment were assessed using a psychiatric interview (K-SADS) supplemented by questionnaires probing social encounters and parental reports of behaviour and attention. Their psycho-social adjustment was compared with that of a cross-sectional control group of age-matched controls.

RESULTS

Overall the rate of psychiatric disorder was low in the clinical sample and children whose language delay had resolved by 5.5 years had a good outcome. For those whose language difficulties persisted through the school years, there was a raised incidence of attention and social difficulties. These difficulties were partially independent and associated with different language profiles. The group with attention problems showed a profile of specific expressive language difficulties; the group with social difficulties had receptive and expressive language difficulties; and the group with both attention and social difficulties was of low IQ with global language difficulties.

CONCLUSIONS

Amongst children with speech-language delays at 5.5 years, those with more severe and persistent language difficulties and low nonverbal IQ are at higher risk of psychiatric morbidity in adolescence.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of York, Heslington, UK. MJS19@york.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16898989

Citation

Snowling, Margaret J., et al. "Psychosocial Outcomes at 15 Years of Children With a Preschool History of Speech-language Impairment." Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied Disciplines, vol. 47, no. 8, 2006, pp. 759-65.
Snowling MJ, Bishop DV, Stothard SE, et al. Psychosocial outcomes at 15 years of children with a preschool history of speech-language impairment. J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2006;47(8):759-65.
Snowling, M. J., Bishop, D. V., Stothard, S. E., Chipchase, B., & Kaplan, C. (2006). Psychosocial outcomes at 15 years of children with a preschool history of speech-language impairment. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied Disciplines, 47(8), 759-65.
Snowling MJ, et al. Psychosocial Outcomes at 15 Years of Children With a Preschool History of Speech-language Impairment. J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2006;47(8):759-65. PubMed PMID: 16898989.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Psychosocial outcomes at 15 years of children with a preschool history of speech-language impairment. AU - Snowling,Margaret J, AU - Bishop,D V M, AU - Stothard,Susan E, AU - Chipchase,Barry, AU - Kaplan,Carole, PY - 2006/8/11/pubmed PY - 2006/12/16/medline PY - 2006/8/11/entrez SP - 759 EP - 65 JF - Journal of child psychology and psychiatry, and allied disciplines JO - J Child Psychol Psychiatry VL - 47 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND: Evidence suggests there is a heightened risk of psychiatric disorder in children with speech-language impairments. However, not all forms of language impairment are strongly associated with psychosocial difficulty, and some psychiatric disorders (e.g., attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)) are more prevalent than others in language-impaired populations. The present study assessed the psychosocial adjustment in adolescence of young people with history of speech-language impairment, and investigated specific relationships between language deficits and psychiatric disorders. METHODS: Seventy-one young people (aged 15-16 years) with a preschool history of speech-language impairment were assessed using a psychiatric interview (K-SADS) supplemented by questionnaires probing social encounters and parental reports of behaviour and attention. Their psycho-social adjustment was compared with that of a cross-sectional control group of age-matched controls. RESULTS: Overall the rate of psychiatric disorder was low in the clinical sample and children whose language delay had resolved by 5.5 years had a good outcome. For those whose language difficulties persisted through the school years, there was a raised incidence of attention and social difficulties. These difficulties were partially independent and associated with different language profiles. The group with attention problems showed a profile of specific expressive language difficulties; the group with social difficulties had receptive and expressive language difficulties; and the group with both attention and social difficulties was of low IQ with global language difficulties. CONCLUSIONS: Amongst children with speech-language delays at 5.5 years, those with more severe and persistent language difficulties and low nonverbal IQ are at higher risk of psychiatric morbidity in adolescence. SN - 0021-9630 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16898989/Psychosocial_outcomes_at_15_years_of_children_with_a_preschool_history_of_speech_language_impairment_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-7610.2006.01631.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -