Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Anthropometric measures, body composition, body fat distribution, and knee osteoarthritis in women.
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2006 Jul; 14(7):1274-81.O

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Increased BMI is a well-recognized risk factor for radiographic knee osteoarthritis (rKOA); however, the contributions of the components of body composition, body fat distribution, and height to this association are not clear.

RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES

We examined 779 women > or = 45 years of age from the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project. Body composition was assessed using DXA, and rKOA was defined as Kellgren-Lawrence grade > or = 2. Logistic regression models examined the association between rKOA and the fourth compared with the first quartiles of anthropometric, body composition, and fat distribution measures adjusting for age, ethnicity, and prior knee injury.

RESULTS

The adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence interval of BMI and weight were 5.27 (3.05, 9.13) and 5.28 (3.05, 9.16), respectively. In separate models, higher odds of rKOA were also found for fat mass [4.54 (2.68, 7.69)], percent fat mass [3.84 (2.26, 6.54)], lean mass [3.94 (2.22, 6.97)], and waist circumference [4.15 (2.45, 7.02)]. Waist-to-hip ratio was not associated with rKOA [1.45 (0.86, 2.43)], and percent lean mass was associated with lower odds [0.20 (0.11, 0.35)]. Taller women had higher odds of rKOA after adjustment for BMI [1.77 (1.05, 3.00)].

DISCUSSION

This study confirms that BMI and weight are strongly associated with rKOA in women and suggests that precise measurements of body composition and measures of fat distribution may offer no advantage over the more simple measures of BMI or weight in assessment of risk of rKOA.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Thurston Arthritis Research Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7280, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16899809

Citation

Abbate, Lauren M., et al. "Anthropometric Measures, Body Composition, Body Fat Distribution, and Knee Osteoarthritis in Women." Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), vol. 14, no. 7, 2006, pp. 1274-81.
Abbate LM, Stevens J, Schwartz TA, et al. Anthropometric measures, body composition, body fat distribution, and knee osteoarthritis in women. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2006;14(7):1274-81.
Abbate, L. M., Stevens, J., Schwartz, T. A., Renner, J. B., Helmick, C. G., & Jordan, J. M. (2006). Anthropometric measures, body composition, body fat distribution, and knee osteoarthritis in women. Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), 14(7), 1274-81.
Abbate LM, et al. Anthropometric Measures, Body Composition, Body Fat Distribution, and Knee Osteoarthritis in Women. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2006;14(7):1274-81. PubMed PMID: 16899809.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Anthropometric measures, body composition, body fat distribution, and knee osteoarthritis in women. AU - Abbate,Lauren M, AU - Stevens,June, AU - Schwartz,Todd A, AU - Renner,Jordan B, AU - Helmick,Charles G, AU - Jordan,Joanne M, PY - 2006/8/11/pubmed PY - 2006/12/9/medline PY - 2006/8/11/entrez SP - 1274 EP - 81 JF - Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.) JO - Obesity (Silver Spring) VL - 14 IS - 7 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Increased BMI is a well-recognized risk factor for radiographic knee osteoarthritis (rKOA); however, the contributions of the components of body composition, body fat distribution, and height to this association are not clear. RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES: We examined 779 women > or = 45 years of age from the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project. Body composition was assessed using DXA, and rKOA was defined as Kellgren-Lawrence grade > or = 2. Logistic regression models examined the association between rKOA and the fourth compared with the first quartiles of anthropometric, body composition, and fat distribution measures adjusting for age, ethnicity, and prior knee injury. RESULTS: The adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence interval of BMI and weight were 5.27 (3.05, 9.13) and 5.28 (3.05, 9.16), respectively. In separate models, higher odds of rKOA were also found for fat mass [4.54 (2.68, 7.69)], percent fat mass [3.84 (2.26, 6.54)], lean mass [3.94 (2.22, 6.97)], and waist circumference [4.15 (2.45, 7.02)]. Waist-to-hip ratio was not associated with rKOA [1.45 (0.86, 2.43)], and percent lean mass was associated with lower odds [0.20 (0.11, 0.35)]. Taller women had higher odds of rKOA after adjustment for BMI [1.77 (1.05, 3.00)]. DISCUSSION: This study confirms that BMI and weight are strongly associated with rKOA in women and suggests that precise measurements of body composition and measures of fat distribution may offer no advantage over the more simple measures of BMI or weight in assessment of risk of rKOA. SN - 1930-7381 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16899809/Anthropometric_measures_body_composition_body_fat_distribution_and_knee_osteoarthritis_in_women_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2006.145 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -