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The effect of response uncertainty on illusory biases of perception and action.
Neurosci Lett. 2006 Oct 02; 406(1-2):117-21.NL

Abstract

When task requirements were known in advance, Glazebrook et al. [C.M. Glazebrook, V.P. Dhillon, K.M. Keetch, J. Lyons, E. Amazeen, D.J. Weeks, D. Elliott, Perception-action and the Müller-Lyer illusion: amplitude or endpoint bias?, Exp. Brain Res. 160 (2005) 71-78.] demonstrated that perceptual biases associated with the Müller-Lyer illusion resulted from a misperception of figure extent, while manual aiming biases resulted from a misperception of vertex position. In this study, we examined the degree to which prior knowledge of task requirements influenced how participants coded visual-spatial information associated with Müller-Lyer configurations. Specifically, we investigated how illusory biases are affected when uncertainty exists as to whether participants will be required to make a perceptual-cognitive decision about the length of a figure or complete a rapid aiming movement to a figure vertex. Although aiming movements were completed in a similar manner regardless of the prior knowledge condition, perceptual biases were associated with a misperception of extent when the task was known and a misperception of both extent and position when the task was unknown. These findings indicate that people are flexible in the manner in which they code visual-spatial information.

Authors+Show Affiliations

McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont., L8S 4K1 Canada. keetchkm@mcmaster.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16901634

Citation

Keetch, Katherine M., et al. "The Effect of Response Uncertainty On Illusory Biases of Perception and Action." Neuroscience Letters, vol. 406, no. 1-2, 2006, pp. 117-21.
Keetch KM, Glazebrook CM, Lyons J, et al. The effect of response uncertainty on illusory biases of perception and action. Neurosci Lett. 2006;406(1-2):117-21.
Keetch, K. M., Glazebrook, C. M., Lyons, J., Lam, M. Y., Weeks, D. J., & Elliott, D. (2006). The effect of response uncertainty on illusory biases of perception and action. Neuroscience Letters, 406(1-2), 117-21.
Keetch KM, et al. The Effect of Response Uncertainty On Illusory Biases of Perception and Action. Neurosci Lett. 2006 Oct 2;406(1-2):117-21. PubMed PMID: 16901634.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The effect of response uncertainty on illusory biases of perception and action. AU - Keetch,Katherine M, AU - Glazebrook,Cheryl M, AU - Lyons,James, AU - Lam,Melanie Y, AU - Weeks,Daniel J, AU - Elliott,Digby, Y1 - 2006/08/09/ PY - 2006/01/31/received PY - 2006/05/25/revised PY - 2006/07/12/accepted PY - 2006/8/12/pubmed PY - 2006/11/4/medline PY - 2006/8/12/entrez SP - 117 EP - 21 JF - Neuroscience letters JO - Neurosci. Lett. VL - 406 IS - 1-2 N2 - When task requirements were known in advance, Glazebrook et al. [C.M. Glazebrook, V.P. Dhillon, K.M. Keetch, J. Lyons, E. Amazeen, D.J. Weeks, D. Elliott, Perception-action and the Müller-Lyer illusion: amplitude or endpoint bias?, Exp. Brain Res. 160 (2005) 71-78.] demonstrated that perceptual biases associated with the Müller-Lyer illusion resulted from a misperception of figure extent, while manual aiming biases resulted from a misperception of vertex position. In this study, we examined the degree to which prior knowledge of task requirements influenced how participants coded visual-spatial information associated with Müller-Lyer configurations. Specifically, we investigated how illusory biases are affected when uncertainty exists as to whether participants will be required to make a perceptual-cognitive decision about the length of a figure or complete a rapid aiming movement to a figure vertex. Although aiming movements were completed in a similar manner regardless of the prior knowledge condition, perceptual biases were associated with a misperception of extent when the task was known and a misperception of both extent and position when the task was unknown. These findings indicate that people are flexible in the manner in which they code visual-spatial information. SN - 0304-3940 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16901634/The_effect_of_response_uncertainty_on_illusory_biases_of_perception_and_action_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0304-3940(06)00714-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -