Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Diagnosis underlying appendectomy and coeliac disease risk.
Dig Liver Dis. 2006 Nov; 38(11):823-8.DL

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Earlier studies suggest that appendectomy is associated with a substantially reduced risk of certain types of bowel inflammation such as ulcerative colitis, particularly where the underlying diagnosis is acute appendicitis. Previous research on appendectomy and coeliac disease is inconsistent, based on small numbers with retrospective data collection, and has not differentiated between different diagnoses underlying appendectomy.

OBJECTIVE

To investigate the association of diagnosis underlying appendectomy with coeliac disease.

METHODS

We used Cox regression to study the risk of later appendectomy in more than 14,000 individuals with coeliac disease and 68,000 referents without coeliac disease, identified through the Swedish National Registers 1964-2003, and conditional logistic regression to study the risk of coeliac disease associated with a history of prior appendectomy. Appendectomy was categorised according to the underlying diagnosis: perforated appendicitis, non-perforated appendicitis, and appendectomy without appendicitis.

RESULTS

Overall, coeliac disease was negatively associated with perforated appendicitis (hazard ratio=0.78, 95% confidence interval=0.60-1.01), not associated with non-perforated appendicitis (hazard ratio=1.11, 95% confidence interval=0.99-1.25), but positively associated with appendectomy without appendicitis (hazard ratio=1.58, 95% confidence interval=1.32-1.89). The magnitudes of the relative risks were similar irrespective of whether coeliac disease occurred prior to or after appendectomy.

CONCLUSION

Coeliac disease and perforated appendicitis are negatively associated irrespective of the timing of the conditions. Not surprisingly, CD increases the risk for appendectomy without appendicitis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, Orebro University Hospital, Sweden. jonasludvigsson@yahoo.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16914396

Citation

Ludvigsson, J F., et al. "Diagnosis Underlying Appendectomy and Coeliac Disease Risk." Digestive and Liver Disease : Official Journal of the Italian Society of Gastroenterology and the Italian Association for the Study of the Liver, vol. 38, no. 11, 2006, pp. 823-8.
Ludvigsson JF, Askling J, Ekbom A, et al. Diagnosis underlying appendectomy and coeliac disease risk. Dig Liver Dis. 2006;38(11):823-8.
Ludvigsson, J. F., Askling, J., Ekbom, A., & Montgomery, S. M. (2006). Diagnosis underlying appendectomy and coeliac disease risk. Digestive and Liver Disease : Official Journal of the Italian Society of Gastroenterology and the Italian Association for the Study of the Liver, 38(11), 823-8.
Ludvigsson JF, et al. Diagnosis Underlying Appendectomy and Coeliac Disease Risk. Dig Liver Dis. 2006;38(11):823-8. PubMed PMID: 16914396.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Diagnosis underlying appendectomy and coeliac disease risk. AU - Ludvigsson,J F, AU - Askling,J, AU - Ekbom,A, AU - Montgomery,S M, Y1 - 2006/08/17/ PY - 2006/05/03/received PY - 2006/06/21/revised PY - 2006/06/26/accepted PY - 2006/8/18/pubmed PY - 2007/2/9/medline PY - 2006/8/18/entrez SP - 823 EP - 8 JF - Digestive and liver disease : official journal of the Italian Society of Gastroenterology and the Italian Association for the Study of the Liver JO - Dig Liver Dis VL - 38 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: Earlier studies suggest that appendectomy is associated with a substantially reduced risk of certain types of bowel inflammation such as ulcerative colitis, particularly where the underlying diagnosis is acute appendicitis. Previous research on appendectomy and coeliac disease is inconsistent, based on small numbers with retrospective data collection, and has not differentiated between different diagnoses underlying appendectomy. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association of diagnosis underlying appendectomy with coeliac disease. METHODS: We used Cox regression to study the risk of later appendectomy in more than 14,000 individuals with coeliac disease and 68,000 referents without coeliac disease, identified through the Swedish National Registers 1964-2003, and conditional logistic regression to study the risk of coeliac disease associated with a history of prior appendectomy. Appendectomy was categorised according to the underlying diagnosis: perforated appendicitis, non-perforated appendicitis, and appendectomy without appendicitis. RESULTS: Overall, coeliac disease was negatively associated with perforated appendicitis (hazard ratio=0.78, 95% confidence interval=0.60-1.01), not associated with non-perforated appendicitis (hazard ratio=1.11, 95% confidence interval=0.99-1.25), but positively associated with appendectomy without appendicitis (hazard ratio=1.58, 95% confidence interval=1.32-1.89). The magnitudes of the relative risks were similar irrespective of whether coeliac disease occurred prior to or after appendectomy. CONCLUSION: Coeliac disease and perforated appendicitis are negatively associated irrespective of the timing of the conditions. Not surprisingly, CD increases the risk for appendectomy without appendicitis. SN - 1590-8658 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16914396/Diagnosis_underlying_appendectomy_and_coeliac_disease_risk_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1590-8658(06)00309-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -