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Dietary folate and vitamins B-12 and B-6 not associated with incident Alzheimer's disease.
J Alzheimers Dis 2006; 9(4):435-43JA

Abstract

CONTEXT

It is currently not known whether dietary intakes of folate and vitamins B12 and B6, co-factors in the methylation of homocysteine, protect against Alzheimer's disease.

OBJECTIVE

To examine the association between risk of incident Alzheimer's disease and dietary intakes of folate, vitamin B-12, and vitamin B-6.

DESIGN

Prospective cohort study.

SETTING

Geographically defined biracial Chicago community.

PARTICIPANTS

1,041 residents, aged 65 years and older, initially free of Alzheimer's disease and followed a median 3.9 years for the development of incident disease.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE

Probable Alzheimer's disease identified through structured clinical neurological evaluation using standardized criteria.

RESULTS

A total of 162 persons developed incident Alzheimer's disease during follow-up. In logistic regression models adjusted for age, sex, race, education, cognitive activities, APOE-epsilon4, and dietary intakes of vitamin E in food and total niacin, there was no association between risk of developing Alzheimer's disease and quintiles of folate intake or of vitamin B-12 intake. The adjusted odds ratio was 1.6 (95% confidence interval: 0.5, 5.2) for persons in the highest quintile of total folate intake (median of 752.7 microg/d) compared with persons in the lowest quintile of intake (median, 202.8 microg/d). Compared with persons in the first quintile of total vitamin B-12 intake (median, 3.1 microg/d) the odds ratio was 0.6 (95% confidence interval: 0.2, 1.6) for persons in the fifth quintile of intake (median, 20.6 microg/d). Intake of vitamin B-6 was not associated with incident Alzheimer's disease after control for dietary intakes of vitamin E and total niacin.

CONCLUSION

Dietary intakes of folate, vitamin B-12, or vitamin B-6 do not appear to be associated with the development of Alzheimer's disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Rush Institute for Healthy Aging, Rush University Medical Center, 1645 W. Jackson #675, Chicago, IL 60612, USA. Martha.C.morris@rush.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16917153

Citation

Morris, Martha Clare, et al. "Dietary Folate and Vitamins B-12 and B-6 Not Associated With Incident Alzheimer's Disease." Journal of Alzheimer's Disease : JAD, vol. 9, no. 4, 2006, pp. 435-43.
Morris MC, Evans DA, Schneider JA, et al. Dietary folate and vitamins B-12 and B-6 not associated with incident Alzheimer's disease. J Alzheimers Dis. 2006;9(4):435-43.
Morris, M. C., Evans, D. A., Schneider, J. A., Tangney, C. C., Bienias, J. L., & Aggarwal, N. T. (2006). Dietary folate and vitamins B-12 and B-6 not associated with incident Alzheimer's disease. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease : JAD, 9(4), pp. 435-43.
Morris MC, et al. Dietary Folate and Vitamins B-12 and B-6 Not Associated With Incident Alzheimer's Disease. J Alzheimers Dis. 2006;9(4):435-43. PubMed PMID: 16917153.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary folate and vitamins B-12 and B-6 not associated with incident Alzheimer's disease. AU - Morris,Martha Clare, AU - Evans,Denis A, AU - Schneider,Julie A, AU - Tangney,Christine C, AU - Bienias,Julia L, AU - Aggarwal,Neelum T, PY - 2006/8/19/pubmed PY - 2006/11/1/medline PY - 2006/8/19/entrez SP - 435 EP - 43 JF - Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD JO - J. Alzheimers Dis. VL - 9 IS - 4 N2 - CONTEXT: It is currently not known whether dietary intakes of folate and vitamins B12 and B6, co-factors in the methylation of homocysteine, protect against Alzheimer's disease. OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between risk of incident Alzheimer's disease and dietary intakes of folate, vitamin B-12, and vitamin B-6. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Geographically defined biracial Chicago community. PARTICIPANTS: 1,041 residents, aged 65 years and older, initially free of Alzheimer's disease and followed a median 3.9 years for the development of incident disease. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Probable Alzheimer's disease identified through structured clinical neurological evaluation using standardized criteria. RESULTS: A total of 162 persons developed incident Alzheimer's disease during follow-up. In logistic regression models adjusted for age, sex, race, education, cognitive activities, APOE-epsilon4, and dietary intakes of vitamin E in food and total niacin, there was no association between risk of developing Alzheimer's disease and quintiles of folate intake or of vitamin B-12 intake. The adjusted odds ratio was 1.6 (95% confidence interval: 0.5, 5.2) for persons in the highest quintile of total folate intake (median of 752.7 microg/d) compared with persons in the lowest quintile of intake (median, 202.8 microg/d). Compared with persons in the first quintile of total vitamin B-12 intake (median, 3.1 microg/d) the odds ratio was 0.6 (95% confidence interval: 0.2, 1.6) for persons in the fifth quintile of intake (median, 20.6 microg/d). Intake of vitamin B-6 was not associated with incident Alzheimer's disease after control for dietary intakes of vitamin E and total niacin. CONCLUSION: Dietary intakes of folate, vitamin B-12, or vitamin B-6 do not appear to be associated with the development of Alzheimer's disease. SN - 1387-2877 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16917153/Dietary_folate_and_vitamins_B_12_and_B_6_not_associated_with_incident_Alzheimer's_disease_ L2 - https://content.iospress.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=1387-2877&volume=9&issue=4&spage=435 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -