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Dietary folate and vitamins B-12 and B-6 not associated with incident Alzheimer's disease.

Abstract

CONTEXT

It is currently not known whether dietary intakes of folate and vitamins B12 and B6, co-factors in the methylation of homocysteine, protect against Alzheimer's disease.

OBJECTIVE

To examine the association between risk of incident Alzheimer's disease and dietary intakes of folate, vitamin B-12, and vitamin B-6.

DESIGN

Prospective cohort study.

SETTING

Geographically defined biracial Chicago community.

PARTICIPANTS

1,041 residents, aged 65 years and older, initially free of Alzheimer's disease and followed a median 3.9 years for the development of incident disease.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE

Probable Alzheimer's disease identified through structured clinical neurological evaluation using standardized criteria.

RESULTS

A total of 162 persons developed incident Alzheimer's disease during follow-up. In logistic regression models adjusted for age, sex, race, education, cognitive activities, APOE-epsilon4, and dietary intakes of vitamin E in food and total niacin, there was no association between risk of developing Alzheimer's disease and quintiles of folate intake or of vitamin B-12 intake. The adjusted odds ratio was 1.6 (95% confidence interval: 0.5, 5.2) for persons in the highest quintile of total folate intake (median of 752.7 microg/d) compared with persons in the lowest quintile of intake (median, 202.8 microg/d). Compared with persons in the first quintile of total vitamin B-12 intake (median, 3.1 microg/d) the odds ratio was 0.6 (95% confidence interval: 0.2, 1.6) for persons in the fifth quintile of intake (median, 20.6 microg/d). Intake of vitamin B-6 was not associated with incident Alzheimer's disease after control for dietary intakes of vitamin E and total niacin.

CONCLUSION

Dietary intakes of folate, vitamin B-12, or vitamin B-6 do not appear to be associated with the development of Alzheimer's disease.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Rush Institute for Healthy Aging, Rush University Medical Center, 1645 W. Jackson #675, Chicago, IL 60612, USA. Martha.C.morris@rush.edu

    , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Aged
    Aging
    Alzheimer Disease
    Cohort Studies
    Diet
    Dietary Supplements
    Female
    Folic Acid
    Humans
    Incidence
    Male
    Prospective Studies
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Vitamin B 12
    Vitamin B 6

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    16917153

    Citation

    Morris, Martha Clare, et al. "Dietary Folate and Vitamins B-12 and B-6 Not Associated With Incident Alzheimer's Disease." Journal of Alzheimer's Disease : JAD, vol. 9, no. 4, 2006, pp. 435-43.
    Morris MC, Evans DA, Schneider JA, et al. Dietary folate and vitamins B-12 and B-6 not associated with incident Alzheimer's disease. J Alzheimers Dis. 2006;9(4):435-43.
    Morris, M. C., Evans, D. A., Schneider, J. A., Tangney, C. C., Bienias, J. L., & Aggarwal, N. T. (2006). Dietary folate and vitamins B-12 and B-6 not associated with incident Alzheimer's disease. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease : JAD, 9(4), pp. 435-43.
    Morris MC, et al. Dietary Folate and Vitamins B-12 and B-6 Not Associated With Incident Alzheimer's Disease. J Alzheimers Dis. 2006;9(4):435-43. PubMed PMID: 16917153.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary folate and vitamins B-12 and B-6 not associated with incident Alzheimer's disease. AU - Morris,Martha Clare, AU - Evans,Denis A, AU - Schneider,Julie A, AU - Tangney,Christine C, AU - Bienias,Julia L, AU - Aggarwal,Neelum T, PY - 2006/8/19/pubmed PY - 2006/11/1/medline PY - 2006/8/19/entrez SP - 435 EP - 43 JF - Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD JO - J. Alzheimers Dis. VL - 9 IS - 4 N2 - CONTEXT: It is currently not known whether dietary intakes of folate and vitamins B12 and B6, co-factors in the methylation of homocysteine, protect against Alzheimer's disease. OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between risk of incident Alzheimer's disease and dietary intakes of folate, vitamin B-12, and vitamin B-6. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Geographically defined biracial Chicago community. PARTICIPANTS: 1,041 residents, aged 65 years and older, initially free of Alzheimer's disease and followed a median 3.9 years for the development of incident disease. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Probable Alzheimer's disease identified through structured clinical neurological evaluation using standardized criteria. RESULTS: A total of 162 persons developed incident Alzheimer's disease during follow-up. In logistic regression models adjusted for age, sex, race, education, cognitive activities, APOE-epsilon4, and dietary intakes of vitamin E in food and total niacin, there was no association between risk of developing Alzheimer's disease and quintiles of folate intake or of vitamin B-12 intake. The adjusted odds ratio was 1.6 (95% confidence interval: 0.5, 5.2) for persons in the highest quintile of total folate intake (median of 752.7 microg/d) compared with persons in the lowest quintile of intake (median, 202.8 microg/d). Compared with persons in the first quintile of total vitamin B-12 intake (median, 3.1 microg/d) the odds ratio was 0.6 (95% confidence interval: 0.2, 1.6) for persons in the fifth quintile of intake (median, 20.6 microg/d). Intake of vitamin B-6 was not associated with incident Alzheimer's disease after control for dietary intakes of vitamin E and total niacin. CONCLUSION: Dietary intakes of folate, vitamin B-12, or vitamin B-6 do not appear to be associated with the development of Alzheimer's disease. SN - 1387-2877 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16917153/Dietary_folate_and_vitamins_B_12_and_B_6_not_associated_with_incident_Alzheimer's_disease_ L2 - https://content.iospress.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=1387-2877&volume=9&issue=4&spage=435 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -