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Tissue omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid ratio and risk for coronary artery disease.
Am J Cardiol. 2006 Aug 21; 98(4A):19i-26i.AJ

Abstract

A ratio that estimates tissue proportions of omega-6 fatty acids (linoleic acid and/or arachidonic acid [AA]) and omega-3 fatty acids (eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA], docosahexaenoic acid [DHA], and/or alpha-linolenic acid) has been proposed as a biomarker of risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). Use of an omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid ratio instead of either fatty acid class alone is based on theoretical reasons and has not been validated. The relationship between risk for CAD events and tissue omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid composition was evaluated by pooling data from case-control or prospective cohort studies that examined the risk for CAD end points as a function of tissue fatty acid composition. Thirteen studies were included, 11 case-control and 2 prospective cohort studies, and case-control differences in computed averages of several fatty acids and fatty acid ratios were compared. The largest and most consistent difference was for the sum of EPA + DHA (-11% in cases, p = 0.002). Proportions of EPA, DHA, and AA were about 8% lower in cases, but none of these differences was significant. Total omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids were lower by 7% and 4%, respectively, in cases versus controls, but only the total omega-3 fatty acid difference was significant. The AA/EPA ratio was nonsignificantly lower by 10% in cases. Fatty acid ratios generally failed to distinguish cases from controls, and any discriminatory power they had derived from the omega-3 fatty acid component. Tissue EPA + DHA appears to be the best fatty acid metric for evaluating for CAD risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Mid America Heart Institute of Saint Luke's Health System, Kansas City, Missouri, USA. bill.harris@usd.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16919513

Citation

Harris, William S., et al. "Tissue Omega-6/omega-3 Fatty Acid Ratio and Risk for Coronary Artery Disease." The American Journal of Cardiology, vol. 98, no. 4A, 2006, pp. 19i-26i.
Harris WS, Assaad B, Poston WC. Tissue omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid ratio and risk for coronary artery disease. Am J Cardiol. 2006;98(4A):19i-26i.
Harris, W. S., Assaad, B., & Poston, W. C. (2006). Tissue omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid ratio and risk for coronary artery disease. The American Journal of Cardiology, 98(4A), 19i-26i.
Harris WS, Assaad B, Poston WC. Tissue Omega-6/omega-3 Fatty Acid Ratio and Risk for Coronary Artery Disease. Am J Cardiol. 2006 Aug 21;98(4A):19i-26i. PubMed PMID: 16919513.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Tissue omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid ratio and risk for coronary artery disease. AU - Harris,William S, AU - Assaad,Basel, AU - Poston,W Carlos, Y1 - 2006/05/30/ PY - 2006/8/22/pubmed PY - 2006/9/29/medline PY - 2006/8/22/entrez SP - 19i EP - 26i JF - The American journal of cardiology JO - Am J Cardiol VL - 98 IS - 4A N2 - A ratio that estimates tissue proportions of omega-6 fatty acids (linoleic acid and/or arachidonic acid [AA]) and omega-3 fatty acids (eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA], docosahexaenoic acid [DHA], and/or alpha-linolenic acid) has been proposed as a biomarker of risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). Use of an omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid ratio instead of either fatty acid class alone is based on theoretical reasons and has not been validated. The relationship between risk for CAD events and tissue omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid composition was evaluated by pooling data from case-control or prospective cohort studies that examined the risk for CAD end points as a function of tissue fatty acid composition. Thirteen studies were included, 11 case-control and 2 prospective cohort studies, and case-control differences in computed averages of several fatty acids and fatty acid ratios were compared. The largest and most consistent difference was for the sum of EPA + DHA (-11% in cases, p = 0.002). Proportions of EPA, DHA, and AA were about 8% lower in cases, but none of these differences was significant. Total omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids were lower by 7% and 4%, respectively, in cases versus controls, but only the total omega-3 fatty acid difference was significant. The AA/EPA ratio was nonsignificantly lower by 10% in cases. Fatty acid ratios generally failed to distinguish cases from controls, and any discriminatory power they had derived from the omega-3 fatty acid component. Tissue EPA + DHA appears to be the best fatty acid metric for evaluating for CAD risk. SN - 0002-9149 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16919513/Tissue_omega_6/omega_3_fatty_acid_ratio_and_risk_for_coronary_artery_disease_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-9149(05)02186-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -