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Gender and C-reactive protein: data from the Multiethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) cohort.
Am Heart J. 2006 Sep; 152(3):593-8.AH

Abstract

BACKGROUND

American Heart Association/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines support the measurement of C-reactive protein (CRP) to further risk stratify individuals at intermediate risk (10%-20% 10-year risk) for heart disease. Determining gender-specific differences in CRP may alter how CRP levels are interpreted and used to determine risk.

METHODS

MESA is a prospective cohort consisting of 6814 men and women aged 45 to 84 years recruited from 6 US communities. Nonparametric analyses were performed to determine differences in CRP levels by gender in the entire cohort and after stratifying by use of estrogen medication (n = 944). Stratifying by median body mass index (BMI) and generalized linear models were also used to account for confounding variables associated with CRP.

RESULTS

Overall, women had substantially higher median CRP levels compared with men (2.56 vs 1.43 mg/L, P < .0001). After excluding women using estrogen and individuals with CRP >10 mg/L, median CRP levels remained higher in women compared with men (1.85 vs 1.33 mg/L, P < .0001). When participants were stratified into high and low BMI groups, the gender difference in CRP levels remained. This pattern of higher CRP levels in women was consistent across all ethnic subgroups even after multivariable adjustment.

CONCLUSIONS

C-reactive protein levels were higher in women compared with men despite accounting for BMI and other common confounding variables. This gender difference was maintained across all ethnic subgroups. These results suggest that evaluation of gender-specific CRP cut points to determine cardiovascular risk should be considered.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Internal Medicine/Cardiology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157, USA. slakoski@wfubmc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16923436

Citation

Lakoski, Susan G., et al. "Gender and C-reactive Protein: Data From the Multiethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) Cohort." American Heart Journal, vol. 152, no. 3, 2006, pp. 593-8.
Lakoski SG, Cushman M, Criqui M, et al. Gender and C-reactive protein: data from the Multiethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) cohort. Am Heart J. 2006;152(3):593-8.
Lakoski, S. G., Cushman, M., Criqui, M., Rundek, T., Blumenthal, R. S., D'Agostino, R. B., & Herrington, D. M. (2006). Gender and C-reactive protein: data from the Multiethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) cohort. American Heart Journal, 152(3), 593-8.
Lakoski SG, et al. Gender and C-reactive Protein: Data From the Multiethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) Cohort. Am Heart J. 2006;152(3):593-8. PubMed PMID: 16923436.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Gender and C-reactive protein: data from the Multiethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) cohort. AU - Lakoski,Susan G, AU - Cushman,Mary, AU - Criqui,Michael, AU - Rundek,Tatjana, AU - Blumenthal,Roger S, AU - D'Agostino,Ralph B,Jr AU - Herrington,David M, PY - 2005/09/22/received PY - 2006/02/07/accepted PY - 2006/8/23/pubmed PY - 2006/9/23/medline PY - 2006/8/23/entrez SP - 593 EP - 8 JF - American heart journal JO - Am Heart J VL - 152 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: American Heart Association/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines support the measurement of C-reactive protein (CRP) to further risk stratify individuals at intermediate risk (10%-20% 10-year risk) for heart disease. Determining gender-specific differences in CRP may alter how CRP levels are interpreted and used to determine risk. METHODS: MESA is a prospective cohort consisting of 6814 men and women aged 45 to 84 years recruited from 6 US communities. Nonparametric analyses were performed to determine differences in CRP levels by gender in the entire cohort and after stratifying by use of estrogen medication (n = 944). Stratifying by median body mass index (BMI) and generalized linear models were also used to account for confounding variables associated with CRP. RESULTS: Overall, women had substantially higher median CRP levels compared with men (2.56 vs 1.43 mg/L, P < .0001). After excluding women using estrogen and individuals with CRP >10 mg/L, median CRP levels remained higher in women compared with men (1.85 vs 1.33 mg/L, P < .0001). When participants were stratified into high and low BMI groups, the gender difference in CRP levels remained. This pattern of higher CRP levels in women was consistent across all ethnic subgroups even after multivariable adjustment. CONCLUSIONS: C-reactive protein levels were higher in women compared with men despite accounting for BMI and other common confounding variables. This gender difference was maintained across all ethnic subgroups. These results suggest that evaluation of gender-specific CRP cut points to determine cardiovascular risk should be considered. SN - 1097-6744 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16923436/Gender_and_C_reactive_protein:_data_from_the_Multiethnic_Study_of_Atherosclerosis__MESA__cohort_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-8703(06)00135-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -