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The relationship of low birth weight to blood pressure, cortisol levels, and reactivity in African American adolescents: a pilot study.
Issues Compr Pediatr Nurs. 2006 Jul-Sep; 29(3):173-87.IC

Abstract

Epidemiological studies show a relationship between low birth weight (LBW) and adult cardiovascular disease. Blood pressure and cortisol hyper-responsiveness during physiologic stress may function as biological markers for hypertension. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship of blood pressure and cortisol levels with induced physiologic stress to LBW. Forty-eight adolescents, 14 to 16 years old, were tested for blood pressure and cortisol levels at rest and in response to a physiological stressor. A history of LBW was obtained. Multivariate repeated measures analysis and chi-square analyses were used to determine the changes in blood pressure and cortisol.Forty-eight African American adolescents, mean age 14.98 years (SD = 0.33), completed the study. Thirteen adolescents (27%) reported LBW. Although not statistically significant, systolic and diastolic pressures were 6 mmHg and 2 mmHg, respectively, higher in the LBW group when compared with the normal birth weight (NBW) group (p = 0.33 and p = 0.21, and 6 (46%) had elevated blood pressures (p = 0.005)). Blood pressure changes, cardiovascular reactivity, elevated blood, or all of these were significantly higher in LBW African American adolescents (p = 0.006). Cardiovascular reactivity was not significant (p = 0.208)). The mean average cortisol levels were (18.8 nmol/dL (SD = 11.0) but comparable (p = 0.72)). The number of LBW adolescents with cortisol reactivity was significantly higher that in the NBW group (p = 0.041). This study adds support to the association of LBW to biological markers of hypertension in childhood.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Central Florida School of Nursing, Orlando, Florida, USA. covelli@mail.ucf.edu

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16923680

Citation

McCormick Covelli, Maureen. "The Relationship of Low Birth Weight to Blood Pressure, Cortisol Levels, and Reactivity in African American Adolescents: a Pilot Study." Issues in Comprehensive Pediatric Nursing, vol. 29, no. 3, 2006, pp. 173-87.
McCormick Covelli M. The relationship of low birth weight to blood pressure, cortisol levels, and reactivity in African American adolescents: a pilot study. Issues Compr Pediatr Nurs. 2006;29(3):173-87.
McCormick Covelli, M. (2006). The relationship of low birth weight to blood pressure, cortisol levels, and reactivity in African American adolescents: a pilot study. Issues in Comprehensive Pediatric Nursing, 29(3), 173-87.
McCormick Covelli M. The Relationship of Low Birth Weight to Blood Pressure, Cortisol Levels, and Reactivity in African American Adolescents: a Pilot Study. Issues Compr Pediatr Nurs. 2006 Jul-Sep;29(3):173-87. PubMed PMID: 16923680.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The relationship of low birth weight to blood pressure, cortisol levels, and reactivity in African American adolescents: a pilot study. A1 - McCormick Covelli,Maureen, PY - 2006/8/23/pubmed PY - 2006/12/9/medline PY - 2006/8/23/entrez SP - 173 EP - 87 JF - Issues in comprehensive pediatric nursing JO - Issues Compr Pediatr Nurs VL - 29 IS - 3 N2 - Epidemiological studies show a relationship between low birth weight (LBW) and adult cardiovascular disease. Blood pressure and cortisol hyper-responsiveness during physiologic stress may function as biological markers for hypertension. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship of blood pressure and cortisol levels with induced physiologic stress to LBW. Forty-eight adolescents, 14 to 16 years old, were tested for blood pressure and cortisol levels at rest and in response to a physiological stressor. A history of LBW was obtained. Multivariate repeated measures analysis and chi-square analyses were used to determine the changes in blood pressure and cortisol.Forty-eight African American adolescents, mean age 14.98 years (SD = 0.33), completed the study. Thirteen adolescents (27%) reported LBW. Although not statistically significant, systolic and diastolic pressures were 6 mmHg and 2 mmHg, respectively, higher in the LBW group when compared with the normal birth weight (NBW) group (p = 0.33 and p = 0.21, and 6 (46%) had elevated blood pressures (p = 0.005)). Blood pressure changes, cardiovascular reactivity, elevated blood, or all of these were significantly higher in LBW African American adolescents (p = 0.006). Cardiovascular reactivity was not significant (p = 0.208)). The mean average cortisol levels were (18.8 nmol/dL (SD = 11.0) but comparable (p = 0.72)). The number of LBW adolescents with cortisol reactivity was significantly higher that in the NBW group (p = 0.041). This study adds support to the association of LBW to biological markers of hypertension in childhood. SN - 0146-0862 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16923680/The_relationship_of_low_birth_weight_to_blood_pressure_cortisol_levels_and_reactivity_in_African_American_adolescents:_a_pilot_study_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/highbloodpressure.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -