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The economic burden of angina in women with suspected ischemic heart disease: results from the National Institutes of Health--National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute--sponsored Women's Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation.
Circulation 2006; 114(9):894-904Circ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Coronary angiography is one of the most frequently performed procedures in women; however, nonobstructive (ie, < 50% stenosis) coronary artery disease (CAD) is frequently reported. Few data exist regarding the type and intensity of resource consumption in women with chest pain after coronary angiography.

METHODS AND RESULTS

A total of 883 women referred for coronary angiography were prospectively enrolled in the National Institutes of Health--National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute--sponsored Women's Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation (WISE). Cardiovascular prognosis and cost data were collected. Direct (hospitalizations, office visits, procedures, and drug utilization) and indirect (out-of-pocket, lost productivity, and travel) costs were estimated through 5 years of follow-up. Among 883 women, 62%, 17%, 11%, and 10% had nonobstructive and 1-vessel, 2-vessel, and 3-vessel CAD, respectively. Five-year cardiovascular death or myocardial infarction rates ranged from 4% to 38% for women with nonobstructive to 3-vessel CAD (P < 0.0001). Five-year rates of hospitalization for chest pain occurred in 20% of women with nonobstructive CAD, increasing to 38% to 55% for women with 1-vessel to 3-vessel CAD (P < 0.0001). The volume of repeat catheterizations or angina hospitalizations was 1.8-fold higher in women with nonobstructive versus 1-vessel CAD after 1 year of follow-up (P < 0.0001). Drug treatment was highest for those with nonobstructive or 1-vessel CAD (P < 0.0001). The proportion of costs for anti-ischemic therapy was higher for women with nonobstructive CAD (15% versus 12% for 1-vessel to 3-vessel CAD; P = 0.001). For women with nonobstructive CAD, average lifetime cost estimates were $767,288 (95% CI, $708,480 to $826,097) and ranged from $1,001,493 to $1,051,302 for women with 1-vessel to 3-vessel CAD (P = 0.0003).

CONCLUSIONS

Symptom-driven care is costly even for women with nonobstructive CAD. Our lifetime estimates for costs of cardiovascular care identify a significant subset of women who are unaccounted for within current estimates of the economic burden of coronary heart disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Cedars-Sinai Research Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, Calif, USA. leslee.shaw@emory.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16923752

Citation

Shaw, Leslee J., et al. "The Economic Burden of Angina in Women With Suspected Ischemic Heart Disease: Results From the National Institutes of Health--National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute--sponsored Women's Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation." Circulation, vol. 114, no. 9, 2006, pp. 894-904.
Shaw LJ, Merz CN, Pepine CJ, et al. The economic burden of angina in women with suspected ischemic heart disease: results from the National Institutes of Health--National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute--sponsored Women's Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation. Circulation. 2006;114(9):894-904.
Shaw, L. J., Merz, C. N., Pepine, C. J., Reis, S. E., Bittner, V., Kip, K. E., ... Sopko, G. (2006). The economic burden of angina in women with suspected ischemic heart disease: results from the National Institutes of Health--National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute--sponsored Women's Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation. Circulation, 114(9), pp. 894-904.
Shaw LJ, et al. The Economic Burden of Angina in Women With Suspected Ischemic Heart Disease: Results From the National Institutes of Health--National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute--sponsored Women's Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation. Circulation. 2006 Aug 29;114(9):894-904. PubMed PMID: 16923752.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The economic burden of angina in women with suspected ischemic heart disease: results from the National Institutes of Health--National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute--sponsored Women's Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation. AU - Shaw,Leslee J, AU - Merz,C Noel Bairey, AU - Pepine,Carl J, AU - Reis,Steven E, AU - Bittner,Vera, AU - Kip,Kevin E, AU - Kelsey,Sheryl F, AU - Olson,Marian, AU - Johnson,B Delia, AU - Mankad,Sunil, AU - Sharaf,Barry L, AU - Rogers,William J, AU - Pohost,Gerald M, AU - Sopko,George, AU - ,, Y1 - 2006/08/21/ PY - 2006/8/23/pubmed PY - 2006/9/19/medline PY - 2006/8/23/entrez SP - 894 EP - 904 JF - Circulation JO - Circulation VL - 114 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: Coronary angiography is one of the most frequently performed procedures in women; however, nonobstructive (ie, < 50% stenosis) coronary artery disease (CAD) is frequently reported. Few data exist regarding the type and intensity of resource consumption in women with chest pain after coronary angiography. METHODS AND RESULTS: A total of 883 women referred for coronary angiography were prospectively enrolled in the National Institutes of Health--National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute--sponsored Women's Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation (WISE). Cardiovascular prognosis and cost data were collected. Direct (hospitalizations, office visits, procedures, and drug utilization) and indirect (out-of-pocket, lost productivity, and travel) costs were estimated through 5 years of follow-up. Among 883 women, 62%, 17%, 11%, and 10% had nonobstructive and 1-vessel, 2-vessel, and 3-vessel CAD, respectively. Five-year cardiovascular death or myocardial infarction rates ranged from 4% to 38% for women with nonobstructive to 3-vessel CAD (P < 0.0001). Five-year rates of hospitalization for chest pain occurred in 20% of women with nonobstructive CAD, increasing to 38% to 55% for women with 1-vessel to 3-vessel CAD (P < 0.0001). The volume of repeat catheterizations or angina hospitalizations was 1.8-fold higher in women with nonobstructive versus 1-vessel CAD after 1 year of follow-up (P < 0.0001). Drug treatment was highest for those with nonobstructive or 1-vessel CAD (P < 0.0001). The proportion of costs for anti-ischemic therapy was higher for women with nonobstructive CAD (15% versus 12% for 1-vessel to 3-vessel CAD; P = 0.001). For women with nonobstructive CAD, average lifetime cost estimates were $767,288 (95% CI, $708,480 to $826,097) and ranged from $1,001,493 to $1,051,302 for women with 1-vessel to 3-vessel CAD (P = 0.0003). CONCLUSIONS: Symptom-driven care is costly even for women with nonobstructive CAD. Our lifetime estimates for costs of cardiovascular care identify a significant subset of women who are unaccounted for within current estimates of the economic burden of coronary heart disease. SN - 1524-4539 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16923752/The_economic_burden_of_angina_in_women_with_suspected_ischemic_heart_disease:_results_from_the_National_Institutes_of_Health__National_Heart_Lung_and_Blood_Institute__sponsored_Women's_Ischemia_Syndrome_Evaluation_ L2 - http://www.ahajournals.org/doi/full/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.105.609990?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -