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Factors influencing laboratory workers' decisions to accept or decline anthrax vaccine adsorbed (AVA): results of a decision-making study in CDC's anthrax vaccination program.
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2006 Dec; 15(12):880-8.PD

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Laboratory technicians, laboratory supervisors, decontamination/remediation workers, and environmental investigators are at increased risk for repeated occupational exposure to Bacillus anthracis. In 2002, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommended pre-exposure vaccination for these occupational groups.

OBJECTIVES

To determine (1) the factors that influenced an individual's decision to either accept or decline Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed (AVA), and (2) if laboratory workers' concern about AVA safety was related to their information needs and trust in the information provided.

METHODS

We conducted a decision-making survey of 404 participants at 44 Laboratory Response Network laboratories located throughout the United States. All participants were enrolled between October 2002 and December 2004, and all were eligible to receive AVA according to the 2002 ACIP recommendations. Chi-square tests and multivariate logistic regression were used in the analyses.

RESULTS

The response rate of eligible individuals at participating laboratories was 94% (404/430). Sixty-six percent of respondents accepted and 34% declined AVA. Laboratory workers who declined AVA were more likely to rate their risk of exposure to inhalation anthrax as low (OR = 6.9; 95%CI 1.7, 28.3), report being very concerned (OR = 4.1; 95%CI 1.8, 9.3) or concerned (OR = 2.0; 95%CI 1.3, 3.1) about the safety of the vaccine, report that they did not trust the information provided in the Vaccine Information Statement (VIS) (OR = 2.3; 95%CI 1.1, 4.5), and to be enrolled in the study during 2002 (OR = 24.7; 95%CI 6.4, 95.3) or 2003 (OR = 5.0; 95%CI 2.5, 9.8), the first 2 years of the study. Furthermore, we found a significant association between a participant's level of concern about the safety of AVA and their perception that they received enough information and/or trusted the information in the VIS.

CONCLUSIONS

Low perceived necessity, concern about the safety of the vaccine, and a lack of trust in the VIS were associated with the decision of laboratory workers to decline AVA. Results of this decision-making study may be used to try to improve acceptance rates of AVA among persons considered at high risk, and may inform educational efforts for other adult vaccines.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Immunization Safety Office, Office of the Chief Science Officer, Office of the Director, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16924600

Citation

Fowler, Gabrielle L., et al. "Factors Influencing Laboratory Workers' Decisions to Accept or Decline Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed (AVA): Results of a Decision-making Study in CDC's Anthrax Vaccination Program." Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety, vol. 15, no. 12, 2006, pp. 880-8.
Fowler GL, Baggs JM, Weintraub ES, et al. Factors influencing laboratory workers' decisions to accept or decline anthrax vaccine adsorbed (AVA): results of a decision-making study in CDC's anthrax vaccination program. Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2006;15(12):880-8.
Fowler, G. L., Baggs, J. M., Weintraub, E. S., Martin, S. W., McNeil, M. M., & Gust, D. A. (2006). Factors influencing laboratory workers' decisions to accept or decline anthrax vaccine adsorbed (AVA): results of a decision-making study in CDC's anthrax vaccination program. Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety, 15(12), 880-8.
Fowler GL, et al. Factors Influencing Laboratory Workers' Decisions to Accept or Decline Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed (AVA): Results of a Decision-making Study in CDC's Anthrax Vaccination Program. Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2006;15(12):880-8. PubMed PMID: 16924600.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Factors influencing laboratory workers' decisions to accept or decline anthrax vaccine adsorbed (AVA): results of a decision-making study in CDC's anthrax vaccination program. AU - Fowler,Gabrielle L, AU - Baggs,James M, AU - Weintraub,Eric S, AU - Martin,Stacey W, AU - McNeil,Michael M, AU - Gust,Deborah A, PY - 2006/8/23/pubmed PY - 2007/2/27/medline PY - 2006/8/23/entrez SP - 880 EP - 8 JF - Pharmacoepidemiology and drug safety JO - Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf VL - 15 IS - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND: Laboratory technicians, laboratory supervisors, decontamination/remediation workers, and environmental investigators are at increased risk for repeated occupational exposure to Bacillus anthracis. In 2002, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommended pre-exposure vaccination for these occupational groups. OBJECTIVES: To determine (1) the factors that influenced an individual's decision to either accept or decline Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed (AVA), and (2) if laboratory workers' concern about AVA safety was related to their information needs and trust in the information provided. METHODS: We conducted a decision-making survey of 404 participants at 44 Laboratory Response Network laboratories located throughout the United States. All participants were enrolled between October 2002 and December 2004, and all were eligible to receive AVA according to the 2002 ACIP recommendations. Chi-square tests and multivariate logistic regression were used in the analyses. RESULTS: The response rate of eligible individuals at participating laboratories was 94% (404/430). Sixty-six percent of respondents accepted and 34% declined AVA. Laboratory workers who declined AVA were more likely to rate their risk of exposure to inhalation anthrax as low (OR = 6.9; 95%CI 1.7, 28.3), report being very concerned (OR = 4.1; 95%CI 1.8, 9.3) or concerned (OR = 2.0; 95%CI 1.3, 3.1) about the safety of the vaccine, report that they did not trust the information provided in the Vaccine Information Statement (VIS) (OR = 2.3; 95%CI 1.1, 4.5), and to be enrolled in the study during 2002 (OR = 24.7; 95%CI 6.4, 95.3) or 2003 (OR = 5.0; 95%CI 2.5, 9.8), the first 2 years of the study. Furthermore, we found a significant association between a participant's level of concern about the safety of AVA and their perception that they received enough information and/or trusted the information in the VIS. CONCLUSIONS: Low perceived necessity, concern about the safety of the vaccine, and a lack of trust in the VIS were associated with the decision of laboratory workers to decline AVA. Results of this decision-making study may be used to try to improve acceptance rates of AVA among persons considered at high risk, and may inform educational efforts for other adult vaccines. SN - 1053-8569 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16924600/Factors_influencing_laboratory_workers'_decisions_to_accept_or_decline_anthrax_vaccine_adsorbed__AVA_:_results_of_a_decision_making_study_in_CDC's_anthrax_vaccination_program_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/pds.1302 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -