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Effects of increasing increments of fat- and sugar-rich snacks in the diet on energy and macronutrient intake in lean and overweight men.
Br J Nutr. 2006 Sep; 96(3):596-606.BJ

Abstract

Two studies have examined the effect on energy intake and macronutrient selection of increasing increments of mandatory high-fat or high-sugar snacks into the diet in men. The present study used a within-subject, repeated-measures design. In each experiment, six lean and six overweight, unrestrained men were each studied over three 7 d treatment periods, during which they were given mandatory snacks of the same energy density (550 kJ/100 g) comprising the following (in terms of percentage energy as fat-carbohydrate-protein): high-fat, 80:10:10; high-sugar, 10:80:10, of which 65 % was sugar, and 15 % starch. Subjects were given 0, 1.5 or 3.0 MJ/d snacks, in a randomised counterbalanced design, to be consumed mid-morning and mid-afternoon. Throughout each day, subjects had access ad libitum to fifteen high-protein, fifteen high-fat and fifteen high-carbohydrate foods, rotated on a 3 d menu. Mandatory high-fat snacks significantly elevated energy intake and fat intake, whereas high-sugar snacks elevated energy intake and carbohydrate intake (all P<0.02). Mandatory increases in sugar intake did not displace fat from the diet or vice versa. It was concluded that the ingestion of up to 3 MJ/d high-fat and high-sugar foods promoted weak compensation (18 % and 30 %, respectively) and therefore elevated daily energy intake by approximately 2.0-2.5 MJ.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Rowett Research Institute, Greenburn Road, Bucksburn, Aberdeen AB21 9SB, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16925867

Citation

Mazlan, Nik, et al. "Effects of Increasing Increments of Fat- and Sugar-rich Snacks in the Diet On Energy and Macronutrient Intake in Lean and Overweight Men." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 96, no. 3, 2006, pp. 596-606.
Mazlan N, Horgan G, Whybrow S, et al. Effects of increasing increments of fat- and sugar-rich snacks in the diet on energy and macronutrient intake in lean and overweight men. Br J Nutr. 2006;96(3):596-606.
Mazlan, N., Horgan, G., Whybrow, S., & Stubbs, J. (2006). Effects of increasing increments of fat- and sugar-rich snacks in the diet on energy and macronutrient intake in lean and overweight men. The British Journal of Nutrition, 96(3), 596-606.
Mazlan N, et al. Effects of Increasing Increments of Fat- and Sugar-rich Snacks in the Diet On Energy and Macronutrient Intake in Lean and Overweight Men. Br J Nutr. 2006;96(3):596-606. PubMed PMID: 16925867.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of increasing increments of fat- and sugar-rich snacks in the diet on energy and macronutrient intake in lean and overweight men. AU - Mazlan,Nik, AU - Horgan,Graham, AU - Whybrow,Stephen, AU - Stubbs,James, PY - 2006/8/24/pubmed PY - 2006/10/17/medline PY - 2006/8/24/entrez SP - 596 EP - 606 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br J Nutr VL - 96 IS - 3 N2 - Two studies have examined the effect on energy intake and macronutrient selection of increasing increments of mandatory high-fat or high-sugar snacks into the diet in men. The present study used a within-subject, repeated-measures design. In each experiment, six lean and six overweight, unrestrained men were each studied over three 7 d treatment periods, during which they were given mandatory snacks of the same energy density (550 kJ/100 g) comprising the following (in terms of percentage energy as fat-carbohydrate-protein): high-fat, 80:10:10; high-sugar, 10:80:10, of which 65 % was sugar, and 15 % starch. Subjects were given 0, 1.5 or 3.0 MJ/d snacks, in a randomised counterbalanced design, to be consumed mid-morning and mid-afternoon. Throughout each day, subjects had access ad libitum to fifteen high-protein, fifteen high-fat and fifteen high-carbohydrate foods, rotated on a 3 d menu. Mandatory high-fat snacks significantly elevated energy intake and fat intake, whereas high-sugar snacks elevated energy intake and carbohydrate intake (all P<0.02). Mandatory increases in sugar intake did not displace fat from the diet or vice versa. It was concluded that the ingestion of up to 3 MJ/d high-fat and high-sugar foods promoted weak compensation (18 % and 30 %, respectively) and therefore elevated daily energy intake by approximately 2.0-2.5 MJ. SN - 0007-1145 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16925867/Effects_of_increasing_increments_of_fat__and_sugar_rich_snacks_in_the_diet_on_energy_and_macronutrient_intake_in_lean_and_overweight_men_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&amp;PAGE=linkout&amp;SEARCH=16925867.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -