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Body-mass index and mortality in Korean men and women.
N Engl J Med. 2006 Aug 24; 355(8):779-87.NEJM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Obesity is associated with diverse health risks, but the role of body weight as a risk factor for death remains controversial.

METHODS

We examined the association between body weight and the risk of death in a 12-year prospective cohort study of 1,213,829 Koreans between the ages of 30 and 95 years. We examined 82,372 deaths from any cause and 48,731 deaths from specific diseases (including 29,123 from cancer, 16,426 from atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, and 3362 from respiratory disease) in relation to the body-mass index (BMI) (the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters).

RESULTS

In both sexes, the average baseline BMI was 23.2, and the rate of death from any cause had a J-shaped association with the BMI, regardless of cigarette-smoking history. The risk of death from any cause was lowest among patients with a BMI of 23.0 to 24.9. In all groups, the risk of death from respiratory causes was higher among subjects with a lower BMI, and the risk of death from atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease or cancer was higher among subjects with a higher BMI. The relative risk of death associated with BMI declined with increasing age.

CONCLUSIONS

Underweight, overweight, and obese men and women had higher rates of death than men and women of normal weight. The association of BMI with death varied according to the cause of death and was modified by age, sex, and smoking history.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology and Health Promotion, Graduate School of Public Health, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea. jsunha@yumc.yonsei.ac.krNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16926276

Citation

Jee, Sun Ha, et al. "Body-mass Index and Mortality in Korean Men and Women." The New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 355, no. 8, 2006, pp. 779-87.
Jee SH, Sull JW, Park J, et al. Body-mass index and mortality in Korean men and women. N Engl J Med. 2006;355(8):779-87.
Jee, S. H., Sull, J. W., Park, J., Lee, S. Y., Ohrr, H., Guallar, E., & Samet, J. M. (2006). Body-mass index and mortality in Korean men and women. The New England Journal of Medicine, 355(8), 779-87.
Jee SH, et al. Body-mass Index and Mortality in Korean Men and Women. N Engl J Med. 2006 Aug 24;355(8):779-87. PubMed PMID: 16926276.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Body-mass index and mortality in Korean men and women. AU - Jee,Sun Ha, AU - Sull,Jae Woong, AU - Park,Jungyong, AU - Lee,Sang-Yi, AU - Ohrr,Heechoul, AU - Guallar,Eliseo, AU - Samet,Jonathan M, Y1 - 2006/08/22/ PY - 2006/8/24/pubmed PY - 2006/9/1/medline PY - 2006/8/24/entrez SP - 779 EP - 87 JF - The New England journal of medicine JO - N. Engl. J. Med. VL - 355 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND: Obesity is associated with diverse health risks, but the role of body weight as a risk factor for death remains controversial. METHODS: We examined the association between body weight and the risk of death in a 12-year prospective cohort study of 1,213,829 Koreans between the ages of 30 and 95 years. We examined 82,372 deaths from any cause and 48,731 deaths from specific diseases (including 29,123 from cancer, 16,426 from atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, and 3362 from respiratory disease) in relation to the body-mass index (BMI) (the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters). RESULTS: In both sexes, the average baseline BMI was 23.2, and the rate of death from any cause had a J-shaped association with the BMI, regardless of cigarette-smoking history. The risk of death from any cause was lowest among patients with a BMI of 23.0 to 24.9. In all groups, the risk of death from respiratory causes was higher among subjects with a lower BMI, and the risk of death from atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease or cancer was higher among subjects with a higher BMI. The relative risk of death associated with BMI declined with increasing age. CONCLUSIONS: Underweight, overweight, and obese men and women had higher rates of death than men and women of normal weight. The association of BMI with death varied according to the cause of death and was modified by age, sex, and smoking history. SN - 1533-4406 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16926276/Body_mass_index_and_mortality_in_Korean_men_and_women_ L2 - http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa054017?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -