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Girls and weapons: an international study of the perpetration of violence.
J Urban Health. 2006 Sep; 83(5):788-801.JU

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to describe delinquent girls' weapons preferences where and how often they carried weapons and to identify the most important factors that explained four different weapon-related violent outcomes. A large, high-risk sample of female adolescents consisting of 510 girls aged 14-17 in four cities were interviewed using the same questionnaire and methods. Tabular and logistic regression analyses were applied. Knives emerged as the most frequently reported weapon in all cities. Rates of both lifetime victimization and perpetration of violence with weapons were high in all sites. Starting to carry a weapon as a result of violence was reported by 40% of the girls in Toronto, 28% in Philadelphia, 25% in Amsterdam, and 16% in Montreal. The major predictors of weapon perpetrated violent behaviours included ethnic origin, early onset of delinquent activities, participation in delinquent acts in the past 12 months, gang fighting and carrying a weapon as a result of violence. Site, age and heavy alcohol consumption had a minor impact, and drug use, drug selling, and neighborhood features, none. Despite numerous differences in weapons' prevalence across cities, the logistic regression found that site was only significant in use of an object (Toronto) and not significant in threatening or hurting someone with either a knife or a gun or actually hurting others with a weapon. These findings suggest commonality in serious female violence that extends beyond borders and cultures.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Social, Prevention and Policy Research Department, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. pat_erickson@camh.netNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16937086

Citation

Erickson, Patricia G., et al. "Girls and Weapons: an International Study of the Perpetration of Violence." Journal of Urban Health : Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine, vol. 83, no. 5, 2006, pp. 788-801.
Erickson PG, Butters JE, Cousineau MM, et al. Girls and weapons: an international study of the perpetration of violence. J Urban Health. 2006;83(5):788-801.
Erickson, P. G., Butters, J. E., Cousineau, M. M., Harrison, L., & Korf, D. (2006). Girls and weapons: an international study of the perpetration of violence. Journal of Urban Health : Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine, 83(5), 788-801.
Erickson PG, et al. Girls and Weapons: an International Study of the Perpetration of Violence. J Urban Health. 2006;83(5):788-801. PubMed PMID: 16937086.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Girls and weapons: an international study of the perpetration of violence. AU - Erickson,Patricia G, AU - Butters,Jennifer E, AU - Cousineau,Marie-Marthe, AU - Harrison,Lana, AU - Korf,Dirk, AU - ,, PY - 2006/8/29/pubmed PY - 2006/12/9/medline PY - 2006/8/29/entrez SP - 788 EP - 801 JF - Journal of urban health : bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine JO - J Urban Health VL - 83 IS - 5 N2 - The purpose of this study was to describe delinquent girls' weapons preferences where and how often they carried weapons and to identify the most important factors that explained four different weapon-related violent outcomes. A large, high-risk sample of female adolescents consisting of 510 girls aged 14-17 in four cities were interviewed using the same questionnaire and methods. Tabular and logistic regression analyses were applied. Knives emerged as the most frequently reported weapon in all cities. Rates of both lifetime victimization and perpetration of violence with weapons were high in all sites. Starting to carry a weapon as a result of violence was reported by 40% of the girls in Toronto, 28% in Philadelphia, 25% in Amsterdam, and 16% in Montreal. The major predictors of weapon perpetrated violent behaviours included ethnic origin, early onset of delinquent activities, participation in delinquent acts in the past 12 months, gang fighting and carrying a weapon as a result of violence. Site, age and heavy alcohol consumption had a minor impact, and drug use, drug selling, and neighborhood features, none. Despite numerous differences in weapons' prevalence across cities, the logistic regression found that site was only significant in use of an object (Toronto) and not significant in threatening or hurting someone with either a knife or a gun or actually hurting others with a weapon. These findings suggest commonality in serious female violence that extends beyond borders and cultures. SN - 1099-3460 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16937086/Girls_and_weapons:_an_international_study_of_the_perpetration_of_violence_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11524-006-9038-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -