Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Maternal secure base scripts, children's attachment security, and mother-child narrative styles.
Attach Hum Dev. 2006 Sep; 8(3):241-60.AH

Abstract

This paper reports the results of a study examining links between maternal representations of attachment, child attachment security, and mother and child narrative styles assessed in the context of reminiscences about shared experiences. Participants were 90 mother - child dyads. Child attachment security was assessed using the attachment Q-set and maternal attachment representations were measured using a recently designed instrument that assesses the script-like qualities of those representations. Analyses examined dependencies in the mother - child memory talk data and then assessed the overlap between both mother and child reminiscing styles and the attachment variables. Narrative styles of both the mothers and their children were coherent and consistent for each dyad member. Furthermore, maternal narrative style (e.g., specific and elaborative questions, using confirming evaluation comments) was significantly related to child participation in the narrative. Maternal and child attachment variables were positively and significantly correlated, and child security was positively associated with maternal narrative style. Maternal secure base scripts were also found to be significantly related to the number of references to emotions in both mother and child narratives as well as to children's overall participation in the memory talk. The pattern of results suggests that attachment representations serve as one influence on the manner(s) in which mother - child dyads think about and discuss emotion-laden content relevant to the child's personal autobiography. Furthermore, the results are consistent with the notion that the manner in which children organize their thoughts about emotion are (at least potentially) shaped by the narrative styles of their parents.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Human and Community Development, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL, USA. kbost@uiuc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16938706

Citation

Bost, Kelly K., et al. "Maternal Secure Base Scripts, Children's Attachment Security, and Mother-child Narrative Styles." Attachment & Human Development, vol. 8, no. 3, 2006, pp. 241-60.
Bost KK, Shin N, McBride BA, et al. Maternal secure base scripts, children's attachment security, and mother-child narrative styles. Attach Hum Dev. 2006;8(3):241-60.
Bost, K. K., Shin, N., McBride, B. A., Brown, G. L., Vaughn, B. E., Coppola, G., Veríssimo, M., Monteiro, L., & Korth, B. (2006). Maternal secure base scripts, children's attachment security, and mother-child narrative styles. Attachment & Human Development, 8(3), 241-60.
Bost KK, et al. Maternal Secure Base Scripts, Children's Attachment Security, and Mother-child Narrative Styles. Attach Hum Dev. 2006;8(3):241-60. PubMed PMID: 16938706.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Maternal secure base scripts, children's attachment security, and mother-child narrative styles. AU - Bost,Kelly K, AU - Shin,Nana, AU - McBride,Brent A, AU - Brown,Geoffrey L, AU - Vaughn,Brian E, AU - Coppola,Gabrielle, AU - Veríssimo,Manuela, AU - Monteiro,Ligia, AU - Korth,Byran, PY - 2006/8/30/pubmed PY - 2006/12/16/medline PY - 2006/8/30/entrez SP - 241 EP - 60 JF - Attachment & human development JO - Attach Hum Dev VL - 8 IS - 3 N2 - This paper reports the results of a study examining links between maternal representations of attachment, child attachment security, and mother and child narrative styles assessed in the context of reminiscences about shared experiences. Participants were 90 mother - child dyads. Child attachment security was assessed using the attachment Q-set and maternal attachment representations were measured using a recently designed instrument that assesses the script-like qualities of those representations. Analyses examined dependencies in the mother - child memory talk data and then assessed the overlap between both mother and child reminiscing styles and the attachment variables. Narrative styles of both the mothers and their children were coherent and consistent for each dyad member. Furthermore, maternal narrative style (e.g., specific and elaborative questions, using confirming evaluation comments) was significantly related to child participation in the narrative. Maternal and child attachment variables were positively and significantly correlated, and child security was positively associated with maternal narrative style. Maternal secure base scripts were also found to be significantly related to the number of references to emotions in both mother and child narratives as well as to children's overall participation in the memory talk. The pattern of results suggests that attachment representations serve as one influence on the manner(s) in which mother - child dyads think about and discuss emotion-laden content relevant to the child's personal autobiography. Furthermore, the results are consistent with the notion that the manner in which children organize their thoughts about emotion are (at least potentially) shaped by the narrative styles of their parents. SN - 1461-6734 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16938706/Maternal_secure_base_scripts_children's_attachment_security_and_mother_child_narrative_styles_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14616730600856131 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -