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Correlation of motor evoked potentials with magnetic resonance imaging and neurologic findings in Doberman Pinschers with and without signs of cervical spondylomyelopathy.
Am J Vet Res. 2006 Sep; 67(9):1613-20.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To establish the reference ranges for motor evoked potential (MEP) latency and amplitude in clinically normal Doberman Pinschers, compare the MEPs of Doberman Pinschers with and without clinical signs of cervical spondylomyelopathy (CSM; wobbler syndrome), and determine whether MEP data correlate with neurologic or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings.

ANIMALS

16 clinically normal and 16 CSM-affected Doberman Pinschers.

PROCEDURES

Dogs were classified according to their neurologic deficits. After sedation with acepromazine and hydromorphone, transcranial magnetic MEPs were assessed in each dog; latencies and amplitudes were recorded from the extensor carpi radialis and cranial tibial muscles. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed to evaluate the presence and severity of spinal cord compression.

RESULTS

Significant differences in cranial tibial muscle MEP latencies and amplitudes were detected between clinically normal and CSM-affected dogs. No differences in the extensor carpi radialis MEP were detected between groups. There was a significant correlation (r = 0.776) between the cranial tibial muscle MEP latencies and neurologic findings. Significant correlations were also found between MRI findings and the cranial tibial muscle MEP latencies (r = 0.757) and amplitudes (r = -0.453).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results provided a reference range for MEPs in clinically normal Doberman Pinschers and indicated that cranial tibial muscle MEP latencies correlated well with both MRI and neurologic findings. Because of the high correlation between cranial tibial muscle MEP data and neurologic and MRI findings, MEP assessment could be considered as a screening tool in the management of dogs with spinal cord disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biomedical Sciences, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16948610

Citation

da Costa, Ronaldo C., et al. "Correlation of Motor Evoked Potentials With Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Neurologic Findings in Doberman Pinschers With and Without Signs of Cervical Spondylomyelopathy." American Journal of Veterinary Research, vol. 67, no. 9, 2006, pp. 1613-20.
da Costa RC, Poma R, Parent JM, et al. Correlation of motor evoked potentials with magnetic resonance imaging and neurologic findings in Doberman Pinschers with and without signs of cervical spondylomyelopathy. Am J Vet Res. 2006;67(9):1613-20.
da Costa, R. C., Poma, R., Parent, J. M., Partlow, G., & Monteith, G. (2006). Correlation of motor evoked potentials with magnetic resonance imaging and neurologic findings in Doberman Pinschers with and without signs of cervical spondylomyelopathy. American Journal of Veterinary Research, 67(9), 1613-20.
da Costa RC, et al. Correlation of Motor Evoked Potentials With Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Neurologic Findings in Doberman Pinschers With and Without Signs of Cervical Spondylomyelopathy. Am J Vet Res. 2006;67(9):1613-20. PubMed PMID: 16948610.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Correlation of motor evoked potentials with magnetic resonance imaging and neurologic findings in Doberman Pinschers with and without signs of cervical spondylomyelopathy. AU - da Costa,Ronaldo C, AU - Poma,Roberto, AU - Parent,Joane M, AU - Partlow,Gary, AU - Monteith,Gabrielle, PY - 2006/9/5/pubmed PY - 2006/10/18/medline PY - 2006/9/5/entrez SP - 1613 EP - 20 JF - American journal of veterinary research JO - Am. J. Vet. Res. VL - 67 IS - 9 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To establish the reference ranges for motor evoked potential (MEP) latency and amplitude in clinically normal Doberman Pinschers, compare the MEPs of Doberman Pinschers with and without clinical signs of cervical spondylomyelopathy (CSM; wobbler syndrome), and determine whether MEP data correlate with neurologic or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. ANIMALS: 16 clinically normal and 16 CSM-affected Doberman Pinschers. PROCEDURES: Dogs were classified according to their neurologic deficits. After sedation with acepromazine and hydromorphone, transcranial magnetic MEPs were assessed in each dog; latencies and amplitudes were recorded from the extensor carpi radialis and cranial tibial muscles. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed to evaluate the presence and severity of spinal cord compression. RESULTS: Significant differences in cranial tibial muscle MEP latencies and amplitudes were detected between clinically normal and CSM-affected dogs. No differences in the extensor carpi radialis MEP were detected between groups. There was a significant correlation (r = 0.776) between the cranial tibial muscle MEP latencies and neurologic findings. Significant correlations were also found between MRI findings and the cranial tibial muscle MEP latencies (r = 0.757) and amplitudes (r = -0.453). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Results provided a reference range for MEPs in clinically normal Doberman Pinschers and indicated that cranial tibial muscle MEP latencies correlated well with both MRI and neurologic findings. Because of the high correlation between cranial tibial muscle MEP data and neurologic and MRI findings, MEP assessment could be considered as a screening tool in the management of dogs with spinal cord disease. SN - 0002-9645 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16948610/Correlation_of_motor_evoked_potentials_with_magnetic_resonance_imaging_and_neurologic_findings_in_Doberman_Pinschers_with_and_without_signs_of_cervical_spondylomyelopathy_ L2 - http://avmajournals.avma.org/doi/full/10.2460/ajvr.67.9.1613?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -