Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Long-term follow-up of Swedish children vaccinated with acellular pertussis vaccines at 3, 5, and 12 months of age indicates the need for a booster dose at 5 to 7 years of age.
Pediatrics. 2006 Sep; 118(3):978-84.Ped

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

The purpose of this work was to evaluate the long-term effectiveness of vaccination with acellular pertussis vaccines at 3, 5, and 12 months of age.

METHODS

Clinical follow-up of reported culture- and polymerase chain reaction-confirmed cases of pertussis was initiated during October 1997 in most of Sweden (except Gothenburg and environs). The study population included 90% of Swedish children born during 1996 or later (ie, who received diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccines at 3, 5, and 12 months of age) and children who had participated in a large pertussis vaccine trial in 1993-1996. Age-specific incidences were estimated using reported culture- or polymerase chain reaction-confirmed pertussis from October 1997 to September 2004 in areas covered by enhanced surveillance. In addition, annual overall and age-specific incidences of pertussis throughout Sweden before and after introduction of acellular pertussis vaccines were estimated.

RESULTS

The overall incidence of notified culture- and polymerase chain reaction-confirmed pertussis dropped from 113 to 150 per 100,000 during 1992-1995 to 11 to 16 per 100,000 during 2001-2004. In areas of enhanced surveillance, the incidence of pertussis was 31 per 100,000 person-years after 2 doses and 19 per 100,000 person-years after the third dose at 12 months of age. The age-specific incidence remained low for approximately 5 years after the third dose but increased in children aged 6 to 8 years, becoming 32 and 48 per 100,000 person-years, respectively. The highest incidence occurred among infants who were unvaccinated or had received only 1 dose of diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccine.

CONCLUSIONS

The increased incidence among 7- to 8-year-olds (ie, mainly acellular pertussis vaccine-vaccinated children) suggests waning of vaccine-induced protection from pertussis. Along with a concomitant increase in incidence among infants, most likely infected by older siblings, these data suggest a booster dose of acellular pertussis vaccine is warranted from 5 to 7 years of age.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, SE 171 82 Solna, Sweden. patrick.olin@smi.ki.se.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16950988

Citation

Gustafsson, Lennart, et al. "Long-term Follow-up of Swedish Children Vaccinated With Acellular Pertussis Vaccines at 3, 5, and 12 Months of Age Indicates the Need for a Booster Dose at 5 to 7 Years of Age." Pediatrics, vol. 118, no. 3, 2006, pp. 978-84.
Gustafsson L, Hessel L, Storsaeter J, et al. Long-term follow-up of Swedish children vaccinated with acellular pertussis vaccines at 3, 5, and 12 months of age indicates the need for a booster dose at 5 to 7 years of age. Pediatrics. 2006;118(3):978-84.
Gustafsson, L., Hessel, L., Storsaeter, J., & Olin, P. (2006). Long-term follow-up of Swedish children vaccinated with acellular pertussis vaccines at 3, 5, and 12 months of age indicates the need for a booster dose at 5 to 7 years of age. Pediatrics, 118(3), 978-84.
Gustafsson L, et al. Long-term Follow-up of Swedish Children Vaccinated With Acellular Pertussis Vaccines at 3, 5, and 12 Months of Age Indicates the Need for a Booster Dose at 5 to 7 Years of Age. Pediatrics. 2006;118(3):978-84. PubMed PMID: 16950988.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Long-term follow-up of Swedish children vaccinated with acellular pertussis vaccines at 3, 5, and 12 months of age indicates the need for a booster dose at 5 to 7 years of age. AU - Gustafsson,Lennart, AU - Hessel,Luc, AU - Storsaeter,Jann, AU - Olin,Patrick, PY - 2006/9/5/pubmed PY - 2006/9/30/medline PY - 2006/9/5/entrez SP - 978 EP - 84 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 118 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this work was to evaluate the long-term effectiveness of vaccination with acellular pertussis vaccines at 3, 5, and 12 months of age. METHODS: Clinical follow-up of reported culture- and polymerase chain reaction-confirmed cases of pertussis was initiated during October 1997 in most of Sweden (except Gothenburg and environs). The study population included 90% of Swedish children born during 1996 or later (ie, who received diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccines at 3, 5, and 12 months of age) and children who had participated in a large pertussis vaccine trial in 1993-1996. Age-specific incidences were estimated using reported culture- or polymerase chain reaction-confirmed pertussis from October 1997 to September 2004 in areas covered by enhanced surveillance. In addition, annual overall and age-specific incidences of pertussis throughout Sweden before and after introduction of acellular pertussis vaccines were estimated. RESULTS: The overall incidence of notified culture- and polymerase chain reaction-confirmed pertussis dropped from 113 to 150 per 100,000 during 1992-1995 to 11 to 16 per 100,000 during 2001-2004. In areas of enhanced surveillance, the incidence of pertussis was 31 per 100,000 person-years after 2 doses and 19 per 100,000 person-years after the third dose at 12 months of age. The age-specific incidence remained low for approximately 5 years after the third dose but increased in children aged 6 to 8 years, becoming 32 and 48 per 100,000 person-years, respectively. The highest incidence occurred among infants who were unvaccinated or had received only 1 dose of diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccine. CONCLUSIONS: The increased incidence among 7- to 8-year-olds (ie, mainly acellular pertussis vaccine-vaccinated children) suggests waning of vaccine-induced protection from pertussis. Along with a concomitant increase in incidence among infants, most likely infected by older siblings, these data suggest a booster dose of acellular pertussis vaccine is warranted from 5 to 7 years of age. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16950988/Long_term_follow_up_of_Swedish_children_vaccinated_with_acellular_pertussis_vaccines_at_3_5_and_12_months_of_age_indicates_the_need_for_a_booster_dose_at_5_to_7_years_of_age_ L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=16950988 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -