Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Somatization an independent psychosocial risk factor for irritable bowel syndrome but not dyspepsia: a population-based study.
Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol 2006; 18(10):1101-9EJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

A psychosocial conceptualization for irritable bowel syndrome and unexplained dyspepsia has been proposed, but remains untested. We conducted a comprehensive population-based study to determine what psychiatric and psychosocial factors, if any, are important in irritable bowel syndrome and dyspepsia.

METHODS

Two hundred and seven participants identified from two previous Australian population surveys who also met Rome I criteria for irritable bowel syndrome (n=156) or unexplained dyspepsia (n=51) were included in the study. Consulters (n=103) were those who had had visited their general practitioner for gastrointestinal symptoms at least once in the prior 12 months. Nonconsulters had not sought medical care for gastrointestinal symptoms in the past year. Controls (n=100) did not report having any abdominal pain in a previous population survey. Psychosocial variables were assessed using structured interviews and validated self-report measures.

RESULTS

Psychiatric diagnoses, neuroticism, more highly threatening life event stress, an external locus of control and ineffectual coping styles were significantly associated with having a diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome and/or dyspepsia. Only somatization (odds ratio=5.28, 95% confidence interval 1.57-17.68), however, was independently associated with irritable bowel syndrome. Psychosocial factors did not discriminate between consulters and nonconsulters.

CONCLUSIONS

Somatization is likely play a key role in explaining irritable bowel syndrome but not dyspepsia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Psychology, University of Queensland, St Lucia Campus, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. koloski@psy.uq.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16957517

Citation

Koloski, Natasha A., et al. "Somatization an Independent Psychosocial Risk Factor for Irritable Bowel Syndrome but Not Dyspepsia: a Population-based Study." European Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, vol. 18, no. 10, 2006, pp. 1101-9.
Koloski NA, Boyce PM, Talley NJ. Somatization an independent psychosocial risk factor for irritable bowel syndrome but not dyspepsia: a population-based study. Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2006;18(10):1101-9.
Koloski, N. A., Boyce, P. M., & Talley, N. J. (2006). Somatization an independent psychosocial risk factor for irritable bowel syndrome but not dyspepsia: a population-based study. European Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, 18(10), pp. 1101-9.
Koloski NA, Boyce PM, Talley NJ. Somatization an Independent Psychosocial Risk Factor for Irritable Bowel Syndrome but Not Dyspepsia: a Population-based Study. Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2006;18(10):1101-9. PubMed PMID: 16957517.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Somatization an independent psychosocial risk factor for irritable bowel syndrome but not dyspepsia: a population-based study. AU - Koloski,Natasha A, AU - Boyce,Philip M, AU - Talley,Nicholas J, PY - 2006/9/8/pubmed PY - 2007/9/28/medline PY - 2006/9/8/entrez SP - 1101 EP - 9 JF - European journal of gastroenterology & hepatology JO - Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol VL - 18 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: A psychosocial conceptualization for irritable bowel syndrome and unexplained dyspepsia has been proposed, but remains untested. We conducted a comprehensive population-based study to determine what psychiatric and psychosocial factors, if any, are important in irritable bowel syndrome and dyspepsia. METHODS: Two hundred and seven participants identified from two previous Australian population surveys who also met Rome I criteria for irritable bowel syndrome (n=156) or unexplained dyspepsia (n=51) were included in the study. Consulters (n=103) were those who had had visited their general practitioner for gastrointestinal symptoms at least once in the prior 12 months. Nonconsulters had not sought medical care for gastrointestinal symptoms in the past year. Controls (n=100) did not report having any abdominal pain in a previous population survey. Psychosocial variables were assessed using structured interviews and validated self-report measures. RESULTS: Psychiatric diagnoses, neuroticism, more highly threatening life event stress, an external locus of control and ineffectual coping styles were significantly associated with having a diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome and/or dyspepsia. Only somatization (odds ratio=5.28, 95% confidence interval 1.57-17.68), however, was independently associated with irritable bowel syndrome. Psychosocial factors did not discriminate between consulters and nonconsulters. CONCLUSIONS: Somatization is likely play a key role in explaining irritable bowel syndrome but not dyspepsia. SN - 0954-691X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16957517/Somatization_an_independent_psychosocial_risk_factor_for_irritable_bowel_syndrome_but_not_dyspepsia:_a_population_based_study_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=16957517 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -