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Emotional responses to unpleasant music correlates with damage to the parahippocampal cortex.
Brain. 2006 Oct; 129(Pt 10):2585-92.B

Abstract

Music is typically a pleasurable experience. But under certain circumstances, music can also be unpleasant, for example, when a young child randomly hits piano keys. Such unpleasant musical experiences have been shown to activate a network of brain structures involved in emotion, mostly located in the medial temporal lobe: the parahippocampal gyrus, amygdala, hippocampus and temporal pole. However, the differential roles of these regions remain largely unknown. In this study, pleasant and unpleasant music was presented to 17 patients with variable excisions of the medial temporal lobe, as well as to 19 matched controls. The pleasant music corresponded to happy and sad selections taken from the classical instrumental repertoire; the unpleasant music was the dissonant arrangement of the same selections. Only patients with substantial resections of the left or right parahippocampal cortex (PHC) gave highly abnormal judgements to dissonant music; they rated dissonant music as slightly pleasant while controls found it unpleasant. This indifference to dissonance was correlated with the remaining volume in the PHC, but was unrelated to the volume of the surrounding structures. The impairment was specific: the same patients judged consonant music to be pleasant, and were able to judge music as happy or sad. Furthermore, this lack of responsiveness to unpleasantness was not due to a perceptual disorder, because all patients were able to detect intentional errors in the musical excerpts. Moreover, the impairment differed from that induced by amygdala damage alone. These findings are consistent with a two-dimensional model of defensive responses to aversive stimuli, in which the PHC and the amygdala subserve different roles.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16959817

Citation

Gosselin, Nathalie, et al. "Emotional Responses to Unpleasant Music Correlates With Damage to the Parahippocampal Cortex." Brain : a Journal of Neurology, vol. 129, no. Pt 10, 2006, pp. 2585-92.
Gosselin N, Samson S, Adolphs R, et al. Emotional responses to unpleasant music correlates with damage to the parahippocampal cortex. Brain. 2006;129(Pt 10):2585-92.
Gosselin, N., Samson, S., Adolphs, R., Noulhiane, M., Roy, M., Hasboun, D., Baulac, M., & Peretz, I. (2006). Emotional responses to unpleasant music correlates with damage to the parahippocampal cortex. Brain : a Journal of Neurology, 129(Pt 10), 2585-92.
Gosselin N, et al. Emotional Responses to Unpleasant Music Correlates With Damage to the Parahippocampal Cortex. Brain. 2006;129(Pt 10):2585-92. PubMed PMID: 16959817.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Emotional responses to unpleasant music correlates with damage to the parahippocampal cortex. AU - Gosselin,Nathalie, AU - Samson,Séverine, AU - Adolphs,Ralph, AU - Noulhiane,Marion, AU - Roy,Mathieu, AU - Hasboun,Dominique, AU - Baulac,Michel, AU - Peretz,Isabelle, Y1 - 2006/09/07/ PY - 2006/9/9/pubmed PY - 2006/11/15/medline PY - 2006/9/9/entrez SP - 2585 EP - 92 JF - Brain : a journal of neurology JO - Brain VL - 129 IS - Pt 10 N2 - Music is typically a pleasurable experience. But under certain circumstances, music can also be unpleasant, for example, when a young child randomly hits piano keys. Such unpleasant musical experiences have been shown to activate a network of brain structures involved in emotion, mostly located in the medial temporal lobe: the parahippocampal gyrus, amygdala, hippocampus and temporal pole. However, the differential roles of these regions remain largely unknown. In this study, pleasant and unpleasant music was presented to 17 patients with variable excisions of the medial temporal lobe, as well as to 19 matched controls. The pleasant music corresponded to happy and sad selections taken from the classical instrumental repertoire; the unpleasant music was the dissonant arrangement of the same selections. Only patients with substantial resections of the left or right parahippocampal cortex (PHC) gave highly abnormal judgements to dissonant music; they rated dissonant music as slightly pleasant while controls found it unpleasant. This indifference to dissonance was correlated with the remaining volume in the PHC, but was unrelated to the volume of the surrounding structures. The impairment was specific: the same patients judged consonant music to be pleasant, and were able to judge music as happy or sad. Furthermore, this lack of responsiveness to unpleasantness was not due to a perceptual disorder, because all patients were able to detect intentional errors in the musical excerpts. Moreover, the impairment differed from that induced by amygdala damage alone. These findings are consistent with a two-dimensional model of defensive responses to aversive stimuli, in which the PHC and the amygdala subserve different roles. SN - 1460-2156 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16959817/Emotional_responses_to_unpleasant_music_correlates_with_damage_to_the_parahippocampal_cortex_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/brain/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/brain/awl240 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -