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The Spanish influenza of 1918 in St. Louis, Missouri.
Public Health Nurs. 2006 Sep-Oct; 23(5):479-83.PH

Abstract

In view of current concern about a possible pandemic of virulent avian influenza, it is timely to revisit the public health response to the "Spanish" influenza of 1918. St. Louis, Missouri, was the most successful of nine largest cities in limiting the death toll from influenza and pneumonia through the use of public health measures during the first 8 weeks of the epidemic. A second wave of cases increased the final death rate, but it remained below that of other major cities. Public health officials attributed the lower death rate to the early and rigorous ban on public gatherings.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Saint Louis University School of Nursing, St Louis, MO 63123, USA. kalninsis@slu.edu

Pub Type(s)

Historical Article
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16961567

Citation

Kalnins, Irene. "The Spanish Influenza of 1918 in St. Louis, Missouri." Public Health Nursing (Boston, Mass.), vol. 23, no. 5, 2006, pp. 479-83.
Kalnins I. The Spanish influenza of 1918 in St. Louis, Missouri. Public Health Nurs. 2006;23(5):479-83.
Kalnins, I. (2006). The Spanish influenza of 1918 in St. Louis, Missouri. Public Health Nursing (Boston, Mass.), 23(5), 479-83.
Kalnins I. The Spanish Influenza of 1918 in St. Louis, Missouri. Public Health Nurs. 2006 Sep-Oct;23(5):479-83. PubMed PMID: 16961567.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The Spanish influenza of 1918 in St. Louis, Missouri. A1 - Kalnins,Irene, PY - 2006/9/12/pubmed PY - 2006/12/9/medline PY - 2006/9/12/entrez SP - 479 EP - 83 JF - Public health nursing (Boston, Mass.) JO - Public Health Nurs VL - 23 IS - 5 N2 - In view of current concern about a possible pandemic of virulent avian influenza, it is timely to revisit the public health response to the "Spanish" influenza of 1918. St. Louis, Missouri, was the most successful of nine largest cities in limiting the death toll from influenza and pneumonia through the use of public health measures during the first 8 weeks of the epidemic. A second wave of cases increased the final death rate, but it remained below that of other major cities. Public health officials attributed the lower death rate to the early and rigorous ban on public gatherings. SN - 0737-1209 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16961567/The_Spanish_influenza_of_1918_in_St__Louis_Missouri_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1525-1446.2006.00586.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -