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Venous thromboembolism and the risk of subsequent symptomatic atherosclerosis.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Recently, we reported an association between asymptomatic carotid atherosclerosis and venous thromboembolism (VTE) of unknown origin. We hypothesized that patients with VTE of unknown origin would be at a higher risk of developing symptomatic atherosclerosis than patients with VTE induced by known risk factors.

METHODS

To examine this hypothesis, we studied 1,919 consecutive patients followed prospectively after their first VTE episode. The primary outcome was non-fatal and fatal symptomatic atherosclerotic disease in patients with VTE of unknown origin as compared to those with secondary VTE. An independent committee assessed all study outcomes, and adjusted hazard ratios (HR) were calculated using the Cox's proportional hazards model.

RESULTS

After a median follow-up of 48 and 51 months, respectively, at least one symptomatic atherosclerotic complication was detected in 160 of the 1,063 patients (15.1%) with VTE of unknown origin, and in 73 of the 856 (8.5%) with secondary VTE. After adjusting for age and other risk factors of atherosclerosis, the HR for symptomatic atherosclerotic complications in patients with VTE of unknown origin compared to those with secondary VTE was 1.6 (95% confidence intervals; CI: 1.2-2.0). When the analysis was restricted to patients without previous symptomatic atherosclerosis, the HR became 1.7 (95% CI: 1.1-2.4).

CONCLUSIONS

Patients with VTE of unknown origin have a 60% higher risk of developing symptomatic atherosclerotic disease than do patients with secondary venous thrombosis.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University Hospital of Padua, Padua, Italy. paoloprandoni@tin.it

    , , , , , , , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Aged
    Atherosclerosis
    Female
    Humans
    Incidence
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Proportional Hazards Models
    Prospective Studies
    Pulmonary Embolism
    Risk
    Risk Factors
    Venous Thrombosis

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    16961597

    Citation

    Prandoni, P, et al. "Venous Thromboembolism and the Risk of Subsequent Symptomatic Atherosclerosis." Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis : JTH, vol. 4, no. 9, 2006, pp. 1891-6.
    Prandoni P, Ghirarduzzi A, Prins MH, et al. Venous thromboembolism and the risk of subsequent symptomatic atherosclerosis. J Thromb Haemost. 2006;4(9):1891-6.
    Prandoni, P., Ghirarduzzi, A., Prins, M. H., Pengo, V., Davidson, B. L., Sørensen, H., ... Lensing, A. W. (2006). Venous thromboembolism and the risk of subsequent symptomatic atherosclerosis. Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis : JTH, 4(9), pp. 1891-6.
    Prandoni P, et al. Venous Thromboembolism and the Risk of Subsequent Symptomatic Atherosclerosis. J Thromb Haemost. 2006;4(9):1891-6. PubMed PMID: 16961597.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Venous thromboembolism and the risk of subsequent symptomatic atherosclerosis. AU - Prandoni,P, AU - Ghirarduzzi,A, AU - Prins,M H, AU - Pengo,V, AU - Davidson,B L, AU - Sørensen,H, AU - Pesavento,R, AU - Iotti,M, AU - Casiglia,E, AU - Iliceto,S, AU - Pagnan,A, AU - Lensing,A W A, PY - 2006/9/12/pubmed PY - 2006/12/9/medline PY - 2006/9/12/entrez SP - 1891 EP - 6 JF - Journal of thrombosis and haemostasis : JTH JO - J. Thromb. Haemost. VL - 4 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: Recently, we reported an association between asymptomatic carotid atherosclerosis and venous thromboembolism (VTE) of unknown origin. We hypothesized that patients with VTE of unknown origin would be at a higher risk of developing symptomatic atherosclerosis than patients with VTE induced by known risk factors. METHODS: To examine this hypothesis, we studied 1,919 consecutive patients followed prospectively after their first VTE episode. The primary outcome was non-fatal and fatal symptomatic atherosclerotic disease in patients with VTE of unknown origin as compared to those with secondary VTE. An independent committee assessed all study outcomes, and adjusted hazard ratios (HR) were calculated using the Cox's proportional hazards model. RESULTS: After a median follow-up of 48 and 51 months, respectively, at least one symptomatic atherosclerotic complication was detected in 160 of the 1,063 patients (15.1%) with VTE of unknown origin, and in 73 of the 856 (8.5%) with secondary VTE. After adjusting for age and other risk factors of atherosclerosis, the HR for symptomatic atherosclerotic complications in patients with VTE of unknown origin compared to those with secondary VTE was 1.6 (95% confidence intervals; CI: 1.2-2.0). When the analysis was restricted to patients without previous symptomatic atherosclerosis, the HR became 1.7 (95% CI: 1.1-2.4). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with VTE of unknown origin have a 60% higher risk of developing symptomatic atherosclerotic disease than do patients with secondary venous thrombosis. SN - 1538-7933 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16961597/Venous_thromboembolism_and_the_risk_of_subsequent_symptomatic_atherosclerosis_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1538-7836.2006.02058.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -