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Interventions with depressed mothers and their infants: modifying interactive behaviours.
J Affect Disord. 2007 Mar; 98(3):199-205.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Postpartum depression (PPD) has a prevalence ranging from 3% to 30% and is associated with serious infant growth and developmental problems. Interventions directed at improving maternal mood have been unsuccessful in producing changes in observed face-to-face interactions between mother and infant. The Keys to Caregiving (KTC) is an intervention program that helps parents to understand and respond to infant behaviours, with a goal of increasing positive affective expressions in infants. In this pilot study, KTC was used with mothers suffering from mild to moderate PPD and their infants.

METHODS

PPD was confirmed by scores on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and the Beck Depression Inventory. Eleven dyads completed the study. KTC was carried out in 5 weekly group sessions, beginning at infant age of 3 months. Dyads were videotaped prior to and after KTC, using the Face-to-Face Still-Face paradigm, which assesses infants' responses during normal play and the effects of the Still-Face perturbation. The tapes were scored for infant facial emotion expressions.

RESULTS

After intervention, infants displayed a marked increase in Interest and Joy when interacting face-to-face with their mothers, even though mothers' depression ratings did not change.

LIMITATIONS

This pilot study is limited by lack of control dyads, however, it provides the foundation necessary for a full trial.

CONCLUSIONS

This study suggests that intervention that focuses on what mothers do with their infants instead of how they feel can be effective in increasing infants' positive responsiveness and improving infant outcomes. Such interventions can be an essential component of treatment when mothers present with postpartum depression.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16962666

Citation

Jung, Vivienne, et al. "Interventions With Depressed Mothers and Their Infants: Modifying Interactive Behaviours." Journal of Affective Disorders, vol. 98, no. 3, 2007, pp. 199-205.
Jung V, Short R, Letourneau N, et al. Interventions with depressed mothers and their infants: modifying interactive behaviours. J Affect Disord. 2007;98(3):199-205.
Jung, V., Short, R., Letourneau, N., & Andrews, D. (2007). Interventions with depressed mothers and their infants: modifying interactive behaviours. Journal of Affective Disorders, 98(3), 199-205.
Jung V, et al. Interventions With Depressed Mothers and Their Infants: Modifying Interactive Behaviours. J Affect Disord. 2007;98(3):199-205. PubMed PMID: 16962666.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Interventions with depressed mothers and their infants: modifying interactive behaviours. AU - Jung,Vivienne, AU - Short,Robert, AU - Letourneau,Nicole, AU - Andrews,Debra, Y1 - 2006/09/08/ PY - 2006/05/30/received PY - 2006/07/13/revised PY - 2006/07/24/accepted PY - 2006/9/12/pubmed PY - 2007/4/21/medline PY - 2006/9/12/entrez SP - 199 EP - 205 JF - Journal of affective disorders JO - J Affect Disord VL - 98 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Postpartum depression (PPD) has a prevalence ranging from 3% to 30% and is associated with serious infant growth and developmental problems. Interventions directed at improving maternal mood have been unsuccessful in producing changes in observed face-to-face interactions between mother and infant. The Keys to Caregiving (KTC) is an intervention program that helps parents to understand and respond to infant behaviours, with a goal of increasing positive affective expressions in infants. In this pilot study, KTC was used with mothers suffering from mild to moderate PPD and their infants. METHODS: PPD was confirmed by scores on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and the Beck Depression Inventory. Eleven dyads completed the study. KTC was carried out in 5 weekly group sessions, beginning at infant age of 3 months. Dyads were videotaped prior to and after KTC, using the Face-to-Face Still-Face paradigm, which assesses infants' responses during normal play and the effects of the Still-Face perturbation. The tapes were scored for infant facial emotion expressions. RESULTS: After intervention, infants displayed a marked increase in Interest and Joy when interacting face-to-face with their mothers, even though mothers' depression ratings did not change. LIMITATIONS: This pilot study is limited by lack of control dyads, however, it provides the foundation necessary for a full trial. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that intervention that focuses on what mothers do with their infants instead of how they feel can be effective in increasing infants' positive responsiveness and improving infant outcomes. Such interventions can be an essential component of treatment when mothers present with postpartum depression. SN - 0165-0327 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16962666/Interventions_with_depressed_mothers_and_their_infants:_modifying_interactive_behaviours_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0165-0327(06)00327-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -