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The objective assessment of lifetime cumulative ultraviolet exposure for determining melanoma risk.
J Photochem Photobiol B 2006; 85(3):198-204JP

Abstract

Exposure to ultraviolet radiation has commonly been recognized as the most important environmental risk factor for melanoma. The measurement of UV exposure in humans, however, has proved challenging. Despite the general appreciation that an objective metric for individual UV exposure is needed to properly assess melanoma risk, little attention has been given to the issue of accuracy of UV exposure measurement. The present research utilized a GIS based historical UV exposure model (for which the accuracy of exposure estimates is known) and examined, in the case-control setting, the relative importance of UV exposure compared to self-reported time spent outdoors, in melanoma risk. UV estimates were coupled with residential histories of 820 representative melanoma cases among non-Hispanic white residents under 65 years of age from Los Angeles County and for 877 controls matched to cases by age, sex, race, and neighborhood of residence, to calculate the cumulative lifetime UV exposure and average annual UV exposure. For historical measures, when the participants resided outside the US, we also calculated UV estimates. While there was no increased risk of melanoma associated with self-reported time spent outdoors, the association between annual average UV exposure based on residential history and melanoma risk was substantial, as was the association between cumulative UV exposure based on residential history and melanoma. The time spent in outdoor activities appeared to have no significant effect on melanoma risk in any age strata, however, when adjusted for UV exposure based on residential history, time spent outdoors during young age significantly increased risk for melanoma. While there was some attenuation of risk when we excluded data from people resident overseas (as all other studies we are aware of have done), this did not significantly impact subsequent risk estimates of UV exposure on melanoma.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Geography, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0255, United States. tatalovi@usc.edu <tatalovi@usc.edu>No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16963272

Citation

Tatalovich, Zaria, et al. "The Objective Assessment of Lifetime Cumulative Ultraviolet Exposure for Determining Melanoma Risk." Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology. B, Biology, vol. 85, no. 3, 2006, pp. 198-204.
Tatalovich Z, Wilson JP, Mack T, et al. The objective assessment of lifetime cumulative ultraviolet exposure for determining melanoma risk. J Photochem Photobiol B, Biol. 2006;85(3):198-204.
Tatalovich, Z., Wilson, J. P., Mack, T., Yan, Y., & Cockburn, M. (2006). The objective assessment of lifetime cumulative ultraviolet exposure for determining melanoma risk. Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology. B, Biology, 85(3), pp. 198-204.
Tatalovich Z, et al. The Objective Assessment of Lifetime Cumulative Ultraviolet Exposure for Determining Melanoma Risk. J Photochem Photobiol B, Biol. 2006 Dec 1;85(3):198-204. PubMed PMID: 16963272.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The objective assessment of lifetime cumulative ultraviolet exposure for determining melanoma risk. AU - Tatalovich,Zaria, AU - Wilson,John P, AU - Mack,Thomas, AU - Yan,Ying, AU - Cockburn,Myles, Y1 - 2006/09/11/ PY - 2006/01/26/received PY - 2006/07/24/revised PY - 2006/08/04/accepted PY - 2006/9/12/pubmed PY - 2007/2/13/medline PY - 2006/9/12/entrez SP - 198 EP - 204 JF - Journal of photochemistry and photobiology. B, Biology JO - J. Photochem. Photobiol. B, Biol. VL - 85 IS - 3 N2 - Exposure to ultraviolet radiation has commonly been recognized as the most important environmental risk factor for melanoma. The measurement of UV exposure in humans, however, has proved challenging. Despite the general appreciation that an objective metric for individual UV exposure is needed to properly assess melanoma risk, little attention has been given to the issue of accuracy of UV exposure measurement. The present research utilized a GIS based historical UV exposure model (for which the accuracy of exposure estimates is known) and examined, in the case-control setting, the relative importance of UV exposure compared to self-reported time spent outdoors, in melanoma risk. UV estimates were coupled with residential histories of 820 representative melanoma cases among non-Hispanic white residents under 65 years of age from Los Angeles County and for 877 controls matched to cases by age, sex, race, and neighborhood of residence, to calculate the cumulative lifetime UV exposure and average annual UV exposure. For historical measures, when the participants resided outside the US, we also calculated UV estimates. While there was no increased risk of melanoma associated with self-reported time spent outdoors, the association between annual average UV exposure based on residential history and melanoma risk was substantial, as was the association between cumulative UV exposure based on residential history and melanoma. The time spent in outdoor activities appeared to have no significant effect on melanoma risk in any age strata, however, when adjusted for UV exposure based on residential history, time spent outdoors during young age significantly increased risk for melanoma. While there was some attenuation of risk when we excluded data from people resident overseas (as all other studies we are aware of have done), this did not significantly impact subsequent risk estimates of UV exposure on melanoma. SN - 1011-1344 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16963272/The_objective_assessment_of_lifetime_cumulative_ultraviolet_exposure_for_determining_melanoma_risk_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1011-1344(06)00192-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -