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Readiness to quit cigarette smoking, intimate partner violence, and substance abuse among arrested violent women.
Am J Addict. 2006 Sep-Oct; 15(5):396-9.AJ

Abstract

Cigarette smoking is a leading cause of preventable mortality in the United States. Not much data are available regarding the prevalence and correlates of cigarette smoking in female perpetrators of intimate partner violence (IPV). Ninety-eight arrested violent women were recruited from court-referred batterer intervention programs. The prevalence of smoking in the sample was 62%. Smokers reported higher levels of substance abuse, psychopathology, general violence, and IPV perpetration and victimization than nonsmokers. Most smokers (65%) indicated a desire to quit within the next year. The results highlight the importance of screening for cigarette smoking in violence intervention programs and offering assistance to those who choose to quit.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Brown Medical School and Butler Hospital, Providence, Rhode Island 02906, USA. gregory_stuart@Brown.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16966197

Citation

Stuart, Gregory L., et al. "Readiness to Quit Cigarette Smoking, Intimate Partner Violence, and Substance Abuse Among Arrested Violent Women." The American Journal On Addictions, vol. 15, no. 5, 2006, pp. 396-9.
Stuart GL, Meehan J, Temple JR, et al. Readiness to quit cigarette smoking, intimate partner violence, and substance abuse among arrested violent women. Am J Addict. 2006;15(5):396-9.
Stuart, G. L., Meehan, J., Temple, J. R., Moore, T. M., Hellmuth, J., Follansbee, K., & Morean, M. (2006). Readiness to quit cigarette smoking, intimate partner violence, and substance abuse among arrested violent women. The American Journal On Addictions, 15(5), 396-9.
Stuart GL, et al. Readiness to Quit Cigarette Smoking, Intimate Partner Violence, and Substance Abuse Among Arrested Violent Women. Am J Addict. 2006 Sep-Oct;15(5):396-9. PubMed PMID: 16966197.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Readiness to quit cigarette smoking, intimate partner violence, and substance abuse among arrested violent women. AU - Stuart,Gregory L, AU - Meehan,Jeffrey, AU - Temple,Jeff R, AU - Moore,Todd M, AU - Hellmuth,Julianne, AU - Follansbee,Katherine, AU - Morean,Meghan, PY - 2006/9/13/pubmed PY - 2007/2/7/medline PY - 2006/9/13/entrez SP - 396 EP - 9 JF - The American journal on addictions JO - Am J Addict VL - 15 IS - 5 N2 - Cigarette smoking is a leading cause of preventable mortality in the United States. Not much data are available regarding the prevalence and correlates of cigarette smoking in female perpetrators of intimate partner violence (IPV). Ninety-eight arrested violent women were recruited from court-referred batterer intervention programs. The prevalence of smoking in the sample was 62%. Smokers reported higher levels of substance abuse, psychopathology, general violence, and IPV perpetration and victimization than nonsmokers. Most smokers (65%) indicated a desire to quit within the next year. The results highlight the importance of screening for cigarette smoking in violence intervention programs and offering assistance to those who choose to quit. SN - 1055-0496 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16966197/Readiness_to_quit_cigarette_smoking_intimate_partner_violence_and_substance_abuse_among_arrested_violent_women_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1080/10550490600860411 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -