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Effect of prepregnancy body mass index categories on obstetrical and neonatal outcomes.
Arch Gynecol Obstet 2007; 275(1):39-43AG

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To examine the association between body mass index (BMI) and obstetrical and neonatal outcomes.

METHODS

We conducted a cohort study comparing prepregnant BMI categories with obstetrical and neonatal outcomes using the McGill Obstetrical and Neonatal Database on all deliveries in 10 year period (1987-1997). Prepregnant BMI was categorized into underweight (<20), normal (20-24.9), overweight (25-29.9), obese (30-39.9), and morbidly obese (40+). Logistic regression analysis was used to adjust for age, smoking, parity, and preexisting diabetes using normal BMI as the reference.

RESULTS

The population consisted of underweight 4,312 (23.1%), normal weight 10,021 (53.8%), overweight 3,069 (16.5%), obese 1,137 (6.1%), and morbidly obese 104 (0.6%). As compared to women with normal BMIs, overweight, obese, and morbidly obese women had an increased risk of preeclampsia 2.28 (1.88-2.77), 4.65 (3.71-5.83), 6.26 (3.48-11.26); gestational hypertension 1.56 (1.35-1.81), 2.01 (1.64-2.45), 2.77 (1.60-4.78); gestational diabetes 1.89 (1.63-2.19), 3.22 (2.68-3.87), 4.71 (2.89-7.67); preterm birth 1.20 (1.04-1.38), 1.60 (1.32-1.94), 2.43 (1.46-4.05); cesarean section 1.48 (1.35-1.62), 1.85 (1.62-2.11), 2.92 (1.97-4.34); and macrosomia 1.66 (1.23-2.24), 2.32 (1.58-3.41), 2.10 (0.64-6.86). Underweight women were less likely to have: preeclampsia 0.67 (0.52-0.86), gestational hypertension 0.71 (0.60-0.83), gestational diabetes 0.82 (0.69-0.97), cesarean section 0.89 (0.81-0.97), shoulder dystocia 0.88 (0.80-0.96), birth injuries 0.40 (0.21-0.77), and macrosomia 0.43 (0.28-0.68) but more likely to have small for gestational age infants 1.54 (1.37-1.72) and intrauterine growth restricted infants 1.33 (1.07-1.67).

CONCLUSION

In a large Canadian teaching hospital, increasing prepregnancy BMI category was associated with an increasing risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. Underweight prepregnancy BMI was associated with a reduced risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, McGill University, Royal Victoria Hospital, Women's Pavillion, 687 Ave des Pins Ouest, F4.46, Montreal, QC, Canada, PQ H3A 1A1. haim.abenhaim@harvard.post.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16967276

Citation

Abenhaim, Haim A., et al. "Effect of Prepregnancy Body Mass Index Categories On Obstetrical and Neonatal Outcomes." Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics, vol. 275, no. 1, 2007, pp. 39-43.
Abenhaim HA, Kinch RA, Morin L, et al. Effect of prepregnancy body mass index categories on obstetrical and neonatal outcomes. Arch Gynecol Obstet. 2007;275(1):39-43.
Abenhaim, H. A., Kinch, R. A., Morin, L., Benjamin, A., & Usher, R. (2007). Effect of prepregnancy body mass index categories on obstetrical and neonatal outcomes. Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics, 275(1), pp. 39-43.
Abenhaim HA, et al. Effect of Prepregnancy Body Mass Index Categories On Obstetrical and Neonatal Outcomes. Arch Gynecol Obstet. 2007;275(1):39-43. PubMed PMID: 16967276.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of prepregnancy body mass index categories on obstetrical and neonatal outcomes. AU - Abenhaim,Haim A, AU - Kinch,Robert A, AU - Morin,Lucie, AU - Benjamin,Alice, AU - Usher,Robert, Y1 - 2006/09/12/ PY - 2006/06/29/received PY - 2006/07/18/accepted PY - 2006/9/13/pubmed PY - 2008/8/30/medline PY - 2006/9/13/entrez SP - 39 EP - 43 JF - Archives of gynecology and obstetrics JO - Arch. Gynecol. Obstet. VL - 275 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To examine the association between body mass index (BMI) and obstetrical and neonatal outcomes. METHODS: We conducted a cohort study comparing prepregnant BMI categories with obstetrical and neonatal outcomes using the McGill Obstetrical and Neonatal Database on all deliveries in 10 year period (1987-1997). Prepregnant BMI was categorized into underweight (<20), normal (20-24.9), overweight (25-29.9), obese (30-39.9), and morbidly obese (40+). Logistic regression analysis was used to adjust for age, smoking, parity, and preexisting diabetes using normal BMI as the reference. RESULTS: The population consisted of underweight 4,312 (23.1%), normal weight 10,021 (53.8%), overweight 3,069 (16.5%), obese 1,137 (6.1%), and morbidly obese 104 (0.6%). As compared to women with normal BMIs, overweight, obese, and morbidly obese women had an increased risk of preeclampsia 2.28 (1.88-2.77), 4.65 (3.71-5.83), 6.26 (3.48-11.26); gestational hypertension 1.56 (1.35-1.81), 2.01 (1.64-2.45), 2.77 (1.60-4.78); gestational diabetes 1.89 (1.63-2.19), 3.22 (2.68-3.87), 4.71 (2.89-7.67); preterm birth 1.20 (1.04-1.38), 1.60 (1.32-1.94), 2.43 (1.46-4.05); cesarean section 1.48 (1.35-1.62), 1.85 (1.62-2.11), 2.92 (1.97-4.34); and macrosomia 1.66 (1.23-2.24), 2.32 (1.58-3.41), 2.10 (0.64-6.86). Underweight women were less likely to have: preeclampsia 0.67 (0.52-0.86), gestational hypertension 0.71 (0.60-0.83), gestational diabetes 0.82 (0.69-0.97), cesarean section 0.89 (0.81-0.97), shoulder dystocia 0.88 (0.80-0.96), birth injuries 0.40 (0.21-0.77), and macrosomia 0.43 (0.28-0.68) but more likely to have small for gestational age infants 1.54 (1.37-1.72) and intrauterine growth restricted infants 1.33 (1.07-1.67). CONCLUSION: In a large Canadian teaching hospital, increasing prepregnancy BMI category was associated with an increasing risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. Underweight prepregnancy BMI was associated with a reduced risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. SN - 0932-0067 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16967276/Effect_of_prepregnancy_body_mass_index_categories_on_obstetrical_and_neonatal_outcomes_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00404-006-0219-y DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -