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The role of private drug vendors as malaria treatment providers in selected malaria endemic areas of Sri Lanka.
J Vector Borne Dis. 2006 Jun; 43(2):58-65.JV

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES

The involvement of private drug vendors in malaria treatment is particularly high in developing countries and understanding their practices and knowledge about antimalarials and malaria treatment will aid in devising strategies to increase the correct use of antimalarials and improve adherence to the government's malaria drug policy. Results of a study on the knowledge and practices of the private drug vendors conducted in seven districts in Sri Lanka, mostly in malarious areas are presented.

METHODS

Data on awareness of government's malaria drug policy, practice of issuing antimalarials, knowledge about malaria and antimalarial drugs were collected from the drug vendors using pre-tested questionnaire in vernacular language. Data were statistically analysed using Stata 8.2. Chi-square test was carried out for individual explanatory variables and a logistic regression model was applied taking all response variables as binary outcome.

RESULTS

Vendors' knowledge on antimalarials was poor with 58% of the vendors being unaware of the government malaria drug policy in the country. Also, the advice provided to customers buying antimalarials was limited. However, the majority of the private vendors emphasised that they were aware of the importance of case confirmation before treatment as stressed in the national policy. Although, the vendors did not have a high awareness of national drug policies they were only found selling chloroquine and primaquine as recommended by the Ministry of Health.

INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSION

In recent years Sri Lanka, as a whole, has experienced very little malaria. The reduction in demand for antimalarials due to low incidence levels may have influenced the knowledge and awareness on antimalarials and government drug policies. However, since low levels of malaria do not guarantee that epidemics will not occur, attempts to educate private drug vendors as a part of an organised control programmes are of major importance.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Zoology, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka. rupikar@pdn.ac.lkNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16967817

Citation

Rajakaruna, R S., et al. "The Role of Private Drug Vendors as Malaria Treatment Providers in Selected Malaria Endemic Areas of Sri Lanka." Journal of Vector Borne Diseases, vol. 43, no. 2, 2006, pp. 58-65.
Rajakaruna RS, Weerasinghe M, Alifrangis M, et al. The role of private drug vendors as malaria treatment providers in selected malaria endemic areas of Sri Lanka. J Vector Borne Dis. 2006;43(2):58-65.
Rajakaruna, R. S., Weerasinghe, M., Alifrangis, M., Amerasinghe, P. H., & Konradsen, F. (2006). The role of private drug vendors as malaria treatment providers in selected malaria endemic areas of Sri Lanka. Journal of Vector Borne Diseases, 43(2), 58-65.
Rajakaruna RS, et al. The Role of Private Drug Vendors as Malaria Treatment Providers in Selected Malaria Endemic Areas of Sri Lanka. J Vector Borne Dis. 2006;43(2):58-65. PubMed PMID: 16967817.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The role of private drug vendors as malaria treatment providers in selected malaria endemic areas of Sri Lanka. AU - Rajakaruna,R S, AU - Weerasinghe,M, AU - Alifrangis,M, AU - Amerasinghe,P H, AU - Konradsen,F, PY - 2006/9/14/pubmed PY - 2006/12/9/medline PY - 2006/9/14/entrez SP - 58 EP - 65 JF - Journal of vector borne diseases JO - J Vector Borne Dis VL - 43 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The involvement of private drug vendors in malaria treatment is particularly high in developing countries and understanding their practices and knowledge about antimalarials and malaria treatment will aid in devising strategies to increase the correct use of antimalarials and improve adherence to the government's malaria drug policy. Results of a study on the knowledge and practices of the private drug vendors conducted in seven districts in Sri Lanka, mostly in malarious areas are presented. METHODS: Data on awareness of government's malaria drug policy, practice of issuing antimalarials, knowledge about malaria and antimalarial drugs were collected from the drug vendors using pre-tested questionnaire in vernacular language. Data were statistically analysed using Stata 8.2. Chi-square test was carried out for individual explanatory variables and a logistic regression model was applied taking all response variables as binary outcome. RESULTS: Vendors' knowledge on antimalarials was poor with 58% of the vendors being unaware of the government malaria drug policy in the country. Also, the advice provided to customers buying antimalarials was limited. However, the majority of the private vendors emphasised that they were aware of the importance of case confirmation before treatment as stressed in the national policy. Although, the vendors did not have a high awareness of national drug policies they were only found selling chloroquine and primaquine as recommended by the Ministry of Health. INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSION: In recent years Sri Lanka, as a whole, has experienced very little malaria. The reduction in demand for antimalarials due to low incidence levels may have influenced the knowledge and awareness on antimalarials and government drug policies. However, since low levels of malaria do not guarantee that epidemics will not occur, attempts to educate private drug vendors as a part of an organised control programmes are of major importance. SN - 0972-9062 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16967817/The_role_of_private_drug_vendors_as_malaria_treatment_providers_in_selected_malaria_endemic_areas_of_Sri_Lanka_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/4415 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -