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Dietary fat and risk of postmenopausal breast cancer in a 20-year follow-up.

Abstract

Dietary fat in midlife has not been associated with breast cancer risk in most studies, but few have followed women beyond one decade. The authors examined the relation of dietary fat, assessed by repeated questionnaires, to incidence of postmenopausal breast cancer in a cohort of 80,375 US women (3,537 new cases) prospectively followed for 20 years between 1980 and 2000. The multivariable relative risk for an increment of 5% of energy from total dietary fat intake was 0.98 (95% confidence interval: 0.95, 1.00). Additionally, specific types of fat were not associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. Furthermore, secondary analyses indicated no differences in breast cancer risk by estrogen receptor or progesterone receptor status. However, stratification by waist circumference indicated a significant decrease in breast cancer risk for participants with a waist circumference of 35 inches (88.9 cm) or greater (p-trend = 0.04). None of the latency intervals investigated were associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. In addition, fat intake before menopause was not related to risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. These results suggest a reduction in breast cancer risk for women with insulin resistance syndrome who consume high-fat diets and no association between specific sources of fat during midlife and risk of postmenopausal breast cancer.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA. ehjkim@hsph.harvard.edu

    , , , , , ,

    Source

    American journal of epidemiology 164:10 2006 Nov 15 pg 990-7

    MeSH

    Aged
    Breast Neoplasms
    Dietary Fats
    Female
    Follow-Up Studies
    Humans
    Middle Aged
    Postmenopause
    Proportional Hazards Models
    Prospective Studies
    Risk Factors
    Surveys and Questionnaires

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    16968865

    Citation

    Kim, Esther H J., et al. "Dietary Fat and Risk of Postmenopausal Breast Cancer in a 20-year Follow-up." American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 164, no. 10, 2006, pp. 990-7.
    Kim EH, Willett WC, Colditz GA, et al. Dietary fat and risk of postmenopausal breast cancer in a 20-year follow-up. Am J Epidemiol. 2006;164(10):990-7.
    Kim, E. H., Willett, W. C., Colditz, G. A., Hankinson, S. E., Stampfer, M. J., Hunter, D. J., ... Holmes, M. D. (2006). Dietary fat and risk of postmenopausal breast cancer in a 20-year follow-up. American Journal of Epidemiology, 164(10), pp. 990-7.
    Kim EH, et al. Dietary Fat and Risk of Postmenopausal Breast Cancer in a 20-year Follow-up. Am J Epidemiol. 2006 Nov 15;164(10):990-7. PubMed PMID: 16968865.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary fat and risk of postmenopausal breast cancer in a 20-year follow-up. AU - Kim,Esther H J, AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Colditz,Graham A, AU - Hankinson,Susan E, AU - Stampfer,Meir J, AU - Hunter,David J, AU - Rosner,Bernard, AU - Holmes,Michelle D, Y1 - 2006/09/12/ PY - 2006/9/14/pubmed PY - 2007/1/6/medline PY - 2006/9/14/entrez SP - 990 EP - 7 JF - American journal of epidemiology JO - Am. J. Epidemiol. VL - 164 IS - 10 N2 - Dietary fat in midlife has not been associated with breast cancer risk in most studies, but few have followed women beyond one decade. The authors examined the relation of dietary fat, assessed by repeated questionnaires, to incidence of postmenopausal breast cancer in a cohort of 80,375 US women (3,537 new cases) prospectively followed for 20 years between 1980 and 2000. The multivariable relative risk for an increment of 5% of energy from total dietary fat intake was 0.98 (95% confidence interval: 0.95, 1.00). Additionally, specific types of fat were not associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. Furthermore, secondary analyses indicated no differences in breast cancer risk by estrogen receptor or progesterone receptor status. However, stratification by waist circumference indicated a significant decrease in breast cancer risk for participants with a waist circumference of 35 inches (88.9 cm) or greater (p-trend = 0.04). None of the latency intervals investigated were associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. In addition, fat intake before menopause was not related to risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. These results suggest a reduction in breast cancer risk for women with insulin resistance syndrome who consume high-fat diets and no association between specific sources of fat during midlife and risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. SN - 0002-9262 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16968865/Dietary_fat_and_risk_of_postmenopausal_breast_cancer_in_a_20_year_follow_up_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/aje/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/aje/kwj309 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -