Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Deletion/insertion polymorphism of the angiotensin-converting enzyme gene and white matter hyperintensities in dementia: A pilot study.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To examine the association between the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) deletion/insertion (D/I) polymorphism and white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) in patients with dementia.

DESIGN

Observational pilot study with adjustment for potential confounders using analysis of covariance.

SETTING

Secondary care old-age psychiatry services in greater Manchester, United Kingdom.

PARTICIPANTS

Ninety-seven patients with dementia: 49 with Alzheimer's disease (AD, National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke/Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association criteria) and 48 with vascular dementia (VaD, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke/Association Internationale pour la Recherche et l'Enseignement en Neurosciences criteria).

MEASUREMENTS

The ACE D/I polymorphism, WMHs (deep WMHs (DWMHs) and periventricular hyperintensities (PVHs)) on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, and potential cardiovascular confounders.

RESULTS

The D/D polymorphism of the ACE genotype was associated with severity of DWMH (P = .005) but not PVH (P = .34), corrected for age, cardiovascular risk factors, and type of dementia. Post hoc analyses were limited by statistical power but suggested an interaction with the apolipoprotein E epsilon4 allele.

CONCLUSION

The results support previous observations that genetic factors influence the development of WMHs in dementia. The involvement of the ACE D/I polymorphism in the pathogenesis of DWMHs in dementia (AD and VaD), by a mechanism that is independent of its association with cardiovascular risk factors, should be confirmed in a large population-based sample.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Division of Psychiatry, Education and Research Center, South Manchester University Hospital, Manchester, United Kingdom. nitin.purandare@manchester.ac.uk

    , , , , , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Alzheimer Disease
    Apolipoprotein E4
    Apolipoproteins E
    Brain
    Dementia, Vascular
    Female
    Genotype
    Humans
    Male
    Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A
    Pilot Projects
    Polymorphism, Genetic

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    16970648

    Citation

    Purandare, Nitin, et al. "Deletion/insertion Polymorphism of the Angiotensin-converting Enzyme Gene and White Matter Hyperintensities in Dementia: a Pilot Study." Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, vol. 54, no. 9, 2006, pp. 1395-400.
    Purandare N, Oude Voshaar RC, Davidson Y, et al. Deletion/insertion polymorphism of the angiotensin-converting enzyme gene and white matter hyperintensities in dementia: A pilot study. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2006;54(9):1395-400.
    Purandare, N., Oude Voshaar, R. C., Davidson, Y., Gibbons, L., Hardicre, J., Byrne, J., ... Mann, D. M. (2006). Deletion/insertion polymorphism of the angiotensin-converting enzyme gene and white matter hyperintensities in dementia: A pilot study. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 54(9), pp. 1395-400.
    Purandare N, et al. Deletion/insertion Polymorphism of the Angiotensin-converting Enzyme Gene and White Matter Hyperintensities in Dementia: a Pilot Study. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2006;54(9):1395-400. PubMed PMID: 16970648.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Deletion/insertion polymorphism of the angiotensin-converting enzyme gene and white matter hyperintensities in dementia: A pilot study. AU - Purandare,Nitin, AU - Oude Voshaar,Richard C, AU - Davidson,Yvonne, AU - Gibbons,Linda, AU - Hardicre,Jayne, AU - Byrne,Jane, AU - McCollum,Charles, AU - Jackson,Alan, AU - Burns,Alistair, AU - Mann,David M A, PY - 2006/9/15/pubmed PY - 2006/10/21/medline PY - 2006/9/15/entrez SP - 1395 EP - 400 JF - Journal of the American Geriatrics Society JO - J Am Geriatr Soc VL - 54 IS - 9 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To examine the association between the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) deletion/insertion (D/I) polymorphism and white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) in patients with dementia. DESIGN: Observational pilot study with adjustment for potential confounders using analysis of covariance. SETTING: Secondary care old-age psychiatry services in greater Manchester, United Kingdom. PARTICIPANTS: Ninety-seven patients with dementia: 49 with Alzheimer's disease (AD, National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke/Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association criteria) and 48 with vascular dementia (VaD, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke/Association Internationale pour la Recherche et l'Enseignement en Neurosciences criteria). MEASUREMENTS: The ACE D/I polymorphism, WMHs (deep WMHs (DWMHs) and periventricular hyperintensities (PVHs)) on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, and potential cardiovascular confounders. RESULTS: The D/D polymorphism of the ACE genotype was associated with severity of DWMH (P = .005) but not PVH (P = .34), corrected for age, cardiovascular risk factors, and type of dementia. Post hoc analyses were limited by statistical power but suggested an interaction with the apolipoprotein E epsilon4 allele. CONCLUSION: The results support previous observations that genetic factors influence the development of WMHs in dementia. The involvement of the ACE D/I polymorphism in the pathogenesis of DWMHs in dementia (AD and VaD), by a mechanism that is independent of its association with cardiovascular risk factors, should be confirmed in a large population-based sample. SN - 0002-8614 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16970648/Deletion/insertion_polymorphism_of_the_angiotensin_converting_enzyme_gene_and_white_matter_hyperintensities_in_dementia:_A_pilot_study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1532-5415.2006.00841.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -