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Influence of the amount of dietary fiber on the available energy from hindgut fermentation in growing pigs: use of cannulated pigs and in vitro fermentation.
J Anim Sci. 2006 Oct; 84(10):2766-78.JA

Abstract

Available energy from hindgut fermentation to pigs fed various amounts of dietary fiber was investigated using an in vivo-in vitro methodology. Six growing pigs fitted with a simple T-shaped cannula at the terminal ileum, and following a Latin-square design, were fed 3 diets differing in the content of non-starch polysaccharides (NSP): a low fiber diet (LFD, 77 g/kg of DM), a standard fiber diet (SFD, 160 g/kg of DM), and a high fiber diet (HFD, 240 g/kg of DM). After adaptation to the diet for 10 d, samples from feces and ileum were collected and analyzed for DM, energy, NSP, and chromic oxide; feces were also analyzed for short chain fatty acids (SCFA). Freeze-dried ileal samples (10 g/L) were fermented in vitro in a fecal slurry consisting of an anaerobic mineral salt medium and feces (50 g/L) from cannulated pigs fed the same diets. Available energy was calculated from the amount of SCFA produced in vitro after 48 h of incubation. Nonstarch polysaccharide content in the fermented material was measured to assess the in vitro degradation of this fraction. Increasing dietary NSP from 77 to 240 g/kg of feed DM increased (P < 0.001) ileal flow from 199 to 468 g/kg of feed, leading to a reduction in the energy digested at the terminal ileum, from 15 to 11 MJ/kg of feed DM and an increment in energy digested in the hindgut, from 1.6 to 3.5 MJ/kg of feed DM. Total in vitro production of SCFA/kg of feed DM was dependent on the amount of ileal substrate available for fermentation; that is, increased concentrations of NSP in the diet led to an increase in the SCFA that may be available to the animal (P < 0.001). The molar ratio of SCFA produced in vitro was affected by diet; the high fiber diet showed the greatest (P = 0.004) proportion of acetic acid, and the low fiber diet showed a tendency (P = 0.081) to an increased butyric acid proportion compared with the other 2 diets. Net disappearance of NSP during fermentation in vivo and in vitro were compared and showed a close relationship (P < 0.001, slope = 0.906, r = 0.960). In our experimental conditions, available energy as SCFA to the animal from hindgut fermentation increased with the concentration of dietary NSP (P < 0.001) and provided between 7.1 and 17.6% of the total available energy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Animal and Food Science, Facultat de Veterinària, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Spain. montserrat.anguita@uab.esNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16971578

Citation

Anguita, M, et al. "Influence of the Amount of Dietary Fiber On the Available Energy From Hindgut Fermentation in Growing Pigs: Use of Cannulated Pigs and in Vitro Fermentation." Journal of Animal Science, vol. 84, no. 10, 2006, pp. 2766-78.
Anguita M, Canibe N, Pérez JF, et al. Influence of the amount of dietary fiber on the available energy from hindgut fermentation in growing pigs: use of cannulated pigs and in vitro fermentation. J Anim Sci. 2006;84(10):2766-78.
Anguita, M., Canibe, N., Pérez, J. F., & Jensen, B. B. (2006). Influence of the amount of dietary fiber on the available energy from hindgut fermentation in growing pigs: use of cannulated pigs and in vitro fermentation. Journal of Animal Science, 84(10), 2766-78.
Anguita M, et al. Influence of the Amount of Dietary Fiber On the Available Energy From Hindgut Fermentation in Growing Pigs: Use of Cannulated Pigs and in Vitro Fermentation. J Anim Sci. 2006;84(10):2766-78. PubMed PMID: 16971578.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Influence of the amount of dietary fiber on the available energy from hindgut fermentation in growing pigs: use of cannulated pigs and in vitro fermentation. AU - Anguita,M, AU - Canibe,N, AU - Pérez,J F, AU - Jensen,B B, PY - 2006/9/15/pubmed PY - 2008/2/21/medline PY - 2006/9/15/entrez SP - 2766 EP - 78 JF - Journal of animal science JO - J Anim Sci VL - 84 IS - 10 N2 - Available energy from hindgut fermentation to pigs fed various amounts of dietary fiber was investigated using an in vivo-in vitro methodology. Six growing pigs fitted with a simple T-shaped cannula at the terminal ileum, and following a Latin-square design, were fed 3 diets differing in the content of non-starch polysaccharides (NSP): a low fiber diet (LFD, 77 g/kg of DM), a standard fiber diet (SFD, 160 g/kg of DM), and a high fiber diet (HFD, 240 g/kg of DM). After adaptation to the diet for 10 d, samples from feces and ileum were collected and analyzed for DM, energy, NSP, and chromic oxide; feces were also analyzed for short chain fatty acids (SCFA). Freeze-dried ileal samples (10 g/L) were fermented in vitro in a fecal slurry consisting of an anaerobic mineral salt medium and feces (50 g/L) from cannulated pigs fed the same diets. Available energy was calculated from the amount of SCFA produced in vitro after 48 h of incubation. Nonstarch polysaccharide content in the fermented material was measured to assess the in vitro degradation of this fraction. Increasing dietary NSP from 77 to 240 g/kg of feed DM increased (P < 0.001) ileal flow from 199 to 468 g/kg of feed, leading to a reduction in the energy digested at the terminal ileum, from 15 to 11 MJ/kg of feed DM and an increment in energy digested in the hindgut, from 1.6 to 3.5 MJ/kg of feed DM. Total in vitro production of SCFA/kg of feed DM was dependent on the amount of ileal substrate available for fermentation; that is, increased concentrations of NSP in the diet led to an increase in the SCFA that may be available to the animal (P < 0.001). The molar ratio of SCFA produced in vitro was affected by diet; the high fiber diet showed the greatest (P = 0.004) proportion of acetic acid, and the low fiber diet showed a tendency (P = 0.081) to an increased butyric acid proportion compared with the other 2 diets. Net disappearance of NSP during fermentation in vivo and in vitro were compared and showed a close relationship (P < 0.001, slope = 0.906, r = 0.960). In our experimental conditions, available energy as SCFA to the animal from hindgut fermentation increased with the concentration of dietary NSP (P < 0.001) and provided between 7.1 and 17.6% of the total available energy. SN - 1525-3163 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16971578/Influence_of_the_amount_of_dietary_fiber_on_the_available_energy_from_hindgut_fermentation_in_growing_pigs:_use_of_cannulated_pigs_and_in_vitro_fermentation_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jas/article-lookup/doi/10.2527/jas.2005-212 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -