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Environmental lead exposure and cognitive function in community-dwelling older adults.
Neurology. 2006 Nov 14; 67(9):1556-62.Neur

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine if long-term exposure to high levels of lead in the environment is associated with decrements in cognitive ability in older Americans.

METHODS

We completed a cross-sectional analysis using multiple linear regression to evaluate associations of recent (in blood) and cumulative (in tibia) lead dose with cognitive function in 991 sociodemographically diverse, community-dwelling adults, aged 50 to 70 years, randomly selected from 65 contiguous neighborhoods in Baltimore, MD. Tibia lead was measured with (109)Cd induced K-shell X-ray fluorescence. Seven summary measures of cognitive function were created based on standard tests in these domains: language, processing speed, eye-hand coordination, executive functioning, verbal memory and learning, visual memory, and visuoconstruction.

RESULTS

The mean (SD) blood lead level was 3.5 (2.2) microg/dL and tibia lead level was 18.7 (11.2) microg/g. Higher tibia lead levels were consistently associated with worse cognitive function in all seven domains after adjusting for age, sex, APOE-epsilon4, and testing technician (six domains p <or= 0.01, one domain p <or= 0.05). Blood lead was not associated with any cognitive domain. Associations with tibia lead were attenuated after adjustment for years of education, wealth, and race/ethnicity.

CONCLUSIONS

Independent of recent lead dose, retained cumulative dose resulting from previous environmental exposures may have persistent effects on cognitive function. A portion of age-related decrements in cognitive function in this population may be associated with earlier lead exposure.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Mental Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16971698

Citation

Shih, R A., et al. "Environmental Lead Exposure and Cognitive Function in Community-dwelling Older Adults." Neurology, vol. 67, no. 9, 2006, pp. 1556-62.
Shih RA, Glass TA, Bandeen-Roche K, et al. Environmental lead exposure and cognitive function in community-dwelling older adults. Neurology. 2006;67(9):1556-62.
Shih, R. A., Glass, T. A., Bandeen-Roche, K., Carlson, M. C., Bolla, K. I., Todd, A. C., & Schwartz, B. S. (2006). Environmental lead exposure and cognitive function in community-dwelling older adults. Neurology, 67(9), 1556-62.
Shih RA, et al. Environmental Lead Exposure and Cognitive Function in Community-dwelling Older Adults. Neurology. 2006 Nov 14;67(9):1556-62. PubMed PMID: 16971698.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Environmental lead exposure and cognitive function in community-dwelling older adults. AU - Shih,R A, AU - Glass,T A, AU - Bandeen-Roche,K, AU - Carlson,M C, AU - Bolla,K I, AU - Todd,A C, AU - Schwartz,B S, Y1 - 2006/09/13/ PY - 2006/9/15/pubmed PY - 2006/12/27/medline PY - 2006/9/15/entrez SP - 1556 EP - 62 JF - Neurology JO - Neurology VL - 67 IS - 9 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine if long-term exposure to high levels of lead in the environment is associated with decrements in cognitive ability in older Americans. METHODS: We completed a cross-sectional analysis using multiple linear regression to evaluate associations of recent (in blood) and cumulative (in tibia) lead dose with cognitive function in 991 sociodemographically diverse, community-dwelling adults, aged 50 to 70 years, randomly selected from 65 contiguous neighborhoods in Baltimore, MD. Tibia lead was measured with (109)Cd induced K-shell X-ray fluorescence. Seven summary measures of cognitive function were created based on standard tests in these domains: language, processing speed, eye-hand coordination, executive functioning, verbal memory and learning, visual memory, and visuoconstruction. RESULTS: The mean (SD) blood lead level was 3.5 (2.2) microg/dL and tibia lead level was 18.7 (11.2) microg/g. Higher tibia lead levels were consistently associated with worse cognitive function in all seven domains after adjusting for age, sex, APOE-epsilon4, and testing technician (six domains p <or= 0.01, one domain p <or= 0.05). Blood lead was not associated with any cognitive domain. Associations with tibia lead were attenuated after adjustment for years of education, wealth, and race/ethnicity. CONCLUSIONS: Independent of recent lead dose, retained cumulative dose resulting from previous environmental exposures may have persistent effects on cognitive function. A portion of age-related decrements in cognitive function in this population may be associated with earlier lead exposure. SN - 1526-632X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16971698/Environmental_lead_exposure_and_cognitive_function_in_community_dwelling_older_adults_ L2 - http://www.neurology.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=16971698 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -