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Microbiological hazards of household toilets: droplet production and the fate of residual organisms.
Appl Microbiol 1975; 30(2):229-37AM

Abstract

Large numbers of bacteria and viruses when seeded into household toilets were shown to remain in the bowl after flushing, and even continual flushing could not remove a persistent fraction. This was found to be due to the adsorption of the organsims to the porcelain surfaces of the bowl, with gradual elution occuring after each flush. Droplets produced by flushing toilets were found to harbor both bacteria and viruses which had been seeded. The detection of bacteria and firuses falling out onto surfaces in bathrooms after flushing indicated that they remain airborne long enough to settle on surfaces throughout the bathroom. Thus, there is a possibility that a person may acquire an infection from an aerosol produced by a toilet.

Authors

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Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

169732

Citation

Gerba, C P., et al. "Microbiological Hazards of Household Toilets: Droplet Production and the Fate of Residual Organisms." Applied Microbiology, vol. 30, no. 2, 1975, pp. 229-37.
Gerba CP, Wallis C, Melnick JL. Microbiological hazards of household toilets: droplet production and the fate of residual organisms. Appl Microbiol. 1975;30(2):229-37.
Gerba, C. P., Wallis, C., & Melnick, J. L. (1975). Microbiological hazards of household toilets: droplet production and the fate of residual organisms. Applied Microbiology, 30(2), pp. 229-37.
Gerba CP, Wallis C, Melnick JL. Microbiological Hazards of Household Toilets: Droplet Production and the Fate of Residual Organisms. Appl Microbiol. 1975;30(2):229-37. PubMed PMID: 169732.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Microbiological hazards of household toilets: droplet production and the fate of residual organisms. AU - Gerba,C P, AU - Wallis,C, AU - Melnick,J L, PY - 1975/8/1/pubmed PY - 1975/8/1/medline PY - 1975/8/1/entrez SP - 229 EP - 37 JF - Applied microbiology JO - Appl Microbiol VL - 30 IS - 2 N2 - Large numbers of bacteria and viruses when seeded into household toilets were shown to remain in the bowl after flushing, and even continual flushing could not remove a persistent fraction. This was found to be due to the adsorption of the organsims to the porcelain surfaces of the bowl, with gradual elution occuring after each flush. Droplets produced by flushing toilets were found to harbor both bacteria and viruses which had been seeded. The detection of bacteria and firuses falling out onto surfaces in bathrooms after flushing indicated that they remain airborne long enough to settle on surfaces throughout the bathroom. Thus, there is a possibility that a person may acquire an infection from an aerosol produced by a toilet. SN - 0003-6919 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/169732/Microbiological_hazards_of_household_toilets:_droplet_production_and_the_fate_of_residual_organisms_ L2 - http://aem.asm.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=169732 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -