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The effects of face cooling during hyperthermic exercise in man: evidence for an integrated thermal, neuroendocrine and behavioural response.
Exp Physiol. 2007 Jan; 92(1):187-95.EP

Abstract

The present study investigated whether face cooling reduced both the perceived exertion (RPE) and prolactin (PRL) release during hyperthermic exercise. Ten, non-heat-acclimated males (23 +/- 2 years; maximal oxygen consumption, 56 +/- 7 ml kg(-1) min(-1) [mean +/- s.d.]) exercised for 40 min on a cycle ergometer at 65% of their peak aerobic power, at an ambient temperature of 33 degrees C (27% relative humidity) with (FC) and without face cooling as a control (CON). With FC, forehead temperature was maintained approximately 6 degrees C lower than CON, while other skin sites were similar or slightly warmer in the FC condition. Rectal temperature increased by approximately 1.5 degrees C with the same time course in both conditions. A relative bradycardia was observed during FC, with heart rate approximately 5 beats min(-1) lower than CON (P < 0.05). Mean plasma lactate was lower during FC (FC, 5.0 +/- 0.3 mmol l(-1); CON, 5.9 +/- 0.3 mmol l(-1); P < 0.05) but no differences were observed for plasma glucose, which remained constant during exercise. Levels of PRL were maintained at 175 +/- 17 mIU l(-1) during exercise for FC, while values for CON increased to a peak of 373 +/- 22 mIU l(-1) so that towards the end of the exercise, for the same rectal temperature, PRL was significantly lower in the FC condition (P < 0.05). Global and breathing RPE were reduced but only towards the end of the 40 min of exercise during FC, whilst subjective thermal comfort was significantly lower during FC (P < 0.05). We confirm the substantial effect that FC has on the secretion of PRL during hyperthermic exercise but show that it makes a relatively small contribution to the perception of effort when compared to the effect of a cool total skin area as occurs with exercise in a thermoneutral environment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK. t.mundel@bham.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16973692

Citation

Mündel, Toby, et al. "The Effects of Face Cooling During Hyperthermic Exercise in Man: Evidence for an Integrated Thermal, Neuroendocrine and Behavioural Response." Experimental Physiology, vol. 92, no. 1, 2007, pp. 187-95.
Mündel T, Bunn SJ, Hooper PL, et al. The effects of face cooling during hyperthermic exercise in man: evidence for an integrated thermal, neuroendocrine and behavioural response. Exp Physiol. 2007;92(1):187-95.
Mündel, T., Bunn, S. J., Hooper, P. L., & Jones, D. A. (2007). The effects of face cooling during hyperthermic exercise in man: evidence for an integrated thermal, neuroendocrine and behavioural response. Experimental Physiology, 92(1), 187-95.
Mündel T, et al. The Effects of Face Cooling During Hyperthermic Exercise in Man: Evidence for an Integrated Thermal, Neuroendocrine and Behavioural Response. Exp Physiol. 2007;92(1):187-95. PubMed PMID: 16973692.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The effects of face cooling during hyperthermic exercise in man: evidence for an integrated thermal, neuroendocrine and behavioural response. AU - Mündel,Toby, AU - Bunn,Sabrina J, AU - Hooper,Paula L, AU - Jones,David A, Y1 - 2006/09/14/ PY - 2006/9/16/pubmed PY - 2007/3/24/medline PY - 2006/9/16/entrez SP - 187 EP - 95 JF - Experimental physiology JO - Exp Physiol VL - 92 IS - 1 N2 - The present study investigated whether face cooling reduced both the perceived exertion (RPE) and prolactin (PRL) release during hyperthermic exercise. Ten, non-heat-acclimated males (23 +/- 2 years; maximal oxygen consumption, 56 +/- 7 ml kg(-1) min(-1) [mean +/- s.d.]) exercised for 40 min on a cycle ergometer at 65% of their peak aerobic power, at an ambient temperature of 33 degrees C (27% relative humidity) with (FC) and without face cooling as a control (CON). With FC, forehead temperature was maintained approximately 6 degrees C lower than CON, while other skin sites were similar or slightly warmer in the FC condition. Rectal temperature increased by approximately 1.5 degrees C with the same time course in both conditions. A relative bradycardia was observed during FC, with heart rate approximately 5 beats min(-1) lower than CON (P < 0.05). Mean plasma lactate was lower during FC (FC, 5.0 +/- 0.3 mmol l(-1); CON, 5.9 +/- 0.3 mmol l(-1); P < 0.05) but no differences were observed for plasma glucose, which remained constant during exercise. Levels of PRL were maintained at 175 +/- 17 mIU l(-1) during exercise for FC, while values for CON increased to a peak of 373 +/- 22 mIU l(-1) so that towards the end of the exercise, for the same rectal temperature, PRL was significantly lower in the FC condition (P < 0.05). Global and breathing RPE were reduced but only towards the end of the 40 min of exercise during FC, whilst subjective thermal comfort was significantly lower during FC (P < 0.05). We confirm the substantial effect that FC has on the secretion of PRL during hyperthermic exercise but show that it makes a relatively small contribution to the perception of effort when compared to the effect of a cool total skin area as occurs with exercise in a thermoneutral environment. SN - 0958-0670 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16973692/The_effects_of_face_cooling_during_hyperthermic_exercise_in_man:_evidence_for_an_integrated_thermal_neuroendocrine_and_behavioural_response_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1113/expphysiol.2006.034934 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -