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Effects of conjugated linoleic acid supplementation in layer diet on fatty acid compositions of egg yolk and layer performances.
Poult Sci. 2006 Sep; 85(9):1603-9.PS

Abstract

Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is a mixture of positional and geometric isomers of linoleic acid with conjugated double bonds. Conjugated linoleic acids have been reported to have a wide range of health-beneficial effects, including anticarcinogenic, antiatherogenic, antidiabetic, and immune stimulatory effects. The objective of this study was to investigate the incorporation of CLA into eggs. Three hundred 27-wk-old layers were allocated to 5 dietary treatments (0, 1, 2, 3, and 4% CLA) with 5 replicates. The results of the study showed that average daily feed intakes were similar in all treatment groups, although hens fed with 4% CLA tended to consume less feed than other hens. Body weight gain and mortality rate were not significantly different (P > 0.05). Hens fed 4% dietary CLA had reduced egg, yolk, and albumen weights (P < 0.05). Yolk color significantly decreased as dietary CLA increased (P < 0.01). Shell thickness and Haugh units were not influenced by the dietary CLA. Concentrations of CLA and saturated fatty acids in egg yolk lipids increased as dietary CLA increased (P < 0.01), whereas concentrations of monounsaturated fatty acids and polyunsaturated fatty acids decreased as dietary CLA increased (P < 0.01). It can be concluded from the present experiments that increasing the amount of CLA fed to hens will increase the amount of CLA in egg yolk and that this increase is accompanied by a reduction in the amount of yolk polyunsaturated fatty acids but an increase in yolk saturated fatty acids. Egg size, yolk weight, and Roche-fan determined yolk color significantly decreased at the highest level of CLA supplementation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Animal Production Technology, Institute of Agricultural Technology, Suranaree University of Technology, Muang, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000, Thailand. wisitpor@sut.ac.thNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16977846

Citation

Suksombat, W, et al. "Effects of Conjugated Linoleic Acid Supplementation in Layer Diet On Fatty Acid Compositions of Egg Yolk and Layer Performances." Poultry Science, vol. 85, no. 9, 2006, pp. 1603-9.
Suksombat W, Samitayotin S, Lounglawan P. Effects of conjugated linoleic acid supplementation in layer diet on fatty acid compositions of egg yolk and layer performances. Poult Sci. 2006;85(9):1603-9.
Suksombat, W., Samitayotin, S., & Lounglawan, P. (2006). Effects of conjugated linoleic acid supplementation in layer diet on fatty acid compositions of egg yolk and layer performances. Poultry Science, 85(9), 1603-9.
Suksombat W, Samitayotin S, Lounglawan P. Effects of Conjugated Linoleic Acid Supplementation in Layer Diet On Fatty Acid Compositions of Egg Yolk and Layer Performances. Poult Sci. 2006;85(9):1603-9. PubMed PMID: 16977846.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of conjugated linoleic acid supplementation in layer diet on fatty acid compositions of egg yolk and layer performances. AU - Suksombat,W, AU - Samitayotin,S, AU - Lounglawan,P, PY - 2006/9/19/pubmed PY - 2006/10/14/medline PY - 2006/9/19/entrez SP - 1603 EP - 9 JF - Poultry science JO - Poult. Sci. VL - 85 IS - 9 N2 - Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is a mixture of positional and geometric isomers of linoleic acid with conjugated double bonds. Conjugated linoleic acids have been reported to have a wide range of health-beneficial effects, including anticarcinogenic, antiatherogenic, antidiabetic, and immune stimulatory effects. The objective of this study was to investigate the incorporation of CLA into eggs. Three hundred 27-wk-old layers were allocated to 5 dietary treatments (0, 1, 2, 3, and 4% CLA) with 5 replicates. The results of the study showed that average daily feed intakes were similar in all treatment groups, although hens fed with 4% CLA tended to consume less feed than other hens. Body weight gain and mortality rate were not significantly different (P > 0.05). Hens fed 4% dietary CLA had reduced egg, yolk, and albumen weights (P < 0.05). Yolk color significantly decreased as dietary CLA increased (P < 0.01). Shell thickness and Haugh units were not influenced by the dietary CLA. Concentrations of CLA and saturated fatty acids in egg yolk lipids increased as dietary CLA increased (P < 0.01), whereas concentrations of monounsaturated fatty acids and polyunsaturated fatty acids decreased as dietary CLA increased (P < 0.01). It can be concluded from the present experiments that increasing the amount of CLA fed to hens will increase the amount of CLA in egg yolk and that this increase is accompanied by a reduction in the amount of yolk polyunsaturated fatty acids but an increase in yolk saturated fatty acids. Egg size, yolk weight, and Roche-fan determined yolk color significantly decreased at the highest level of CLA supplementation. SN - 0032-5791 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16977846/Effects_of_conjugated_linoleic_acid_supplementation_in_layer_diet_on_fatty_acid_compositions_of_egg_yolk_and_layer_performances_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ps/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ps/85.9.1603 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -