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Clinical evaluation of dietary modification for treatment of spontaneous chronic kidney disease in cats.
J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2006 Sep 15; 229(6):949-57.JA

Abstract

Objective-To determine whether a renal diet modified in protein, phosphorus, sodium, and lipid content was superior to an adult maintenance diet in minimizing uremic episodes and mortality rate in cats with stage 2 or 3 chronic kidney disease (CKD). Design-Double-masked, randomized, controlled clinical trial. Animals-45 client-owned cats with spontaneous stage 2 or 3 CKD. Procedures-Cats were randomly assigned to an adult maintenance diet (n = 23 cats) or a renal diet (22) and evaluated trimonthly for up to 24 months. Efficacy of the renal diet, compared with the maintenance diet, in minimizing uremia, renal-related deaths, and all causes of death was evaluated. Results-Serum urea nitrogen concentrations were significantly lower and blood bicarbonate concentrations were significantly higher in the renal diet group at baseline and during the 12- and 24-month intervals. Significant differences were not detected in body weight; Hct; urine protein-to-creatinine ratio; and serum creatinine, potassium, calcium, and parathyroid hormone concentrations. A significantly greater percentage of cats fed the maintenance diet had uremic episodes (26%), compared with cats fed the renal diet (0%). A significant reduction in renal-related deaths but not all causes of death was detected in cats fed the renal diet. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-The renal diet evaluated in this study was superior to an adult maintenance diet in minimizing uremic episodes and renalrelated deaths in cats with spontaneous stage 2 or 3 CKD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN 55108, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16978113

Citation

Ross, Sheri J., et al. "Clinical Evaluation of Dietary Modification for Treatment of Spontaneous Chronic Kidney Disease in Cats." Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, vol. 229, no. 6, 2006, pp. 949-57.
Ross SJ, Osborne CA, Kirk CA, et al. Clinical evaluation of dietary modification for treatment of spontaneous chronic kidney disease in cats. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2006;229(6):949-57.
Ross, S. J., Osborne, C. A., Kirk, C. A., Lowry, S. R., Koehler, L. A., & Polzin, D. J. (2006). Clinical evaluation of dietary modification for treatment of spontaneous chronic kidney disease in cats. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 229(6), 949-57.
Ross SJ, et al. Clinical Evaluation of Dietary Modification for Treatment of Spontaneous Chronic Kidney Disease in Cats. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2006 Sep 15;229(6):949-57. PubMed PMID: 16978113.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Clinical evaluation of dietary modification for treatment of spontaneous chronic kidney disease in cats. AU - Ross,Sheri J, AU - Osborne,Carl A, AU - Kirk,Claudia A, AU - Lowry,Stephen R, AU - Koehler,Lori A, AU - Polzin,David J, PY - 2006/9/19/pubmed PY - 2006/10/20/medline PY - 2006/9/19/entrez SP - 949 EP - 57 JF - Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association JO - J. Am. Vet. Med. Assoc. VL - 229 IS - 6 N2 - Objective-To determine whether a renal diet modified in protein, phosphorus, sodium, and lipid content was superior to an adult maintenance diet in minimizing uremic episodes and mortality rate in cats with stage 2 or 3 chronic kidney disease (CKD). Design-Double-masked, randomized, controlled clinical trial. Animals-45 client-owned cats with spontaneous stage 2 or 3 CKD. Procedures-Cats were randomly assigned to an adult maintenance diet (n = 23 cats) or a renal diet (22) and evaluated trimonthly for up to 24 months. Efficacy of the renal diet, compared with the maintenance diet, in minimizing uremia, renal-related deaths, and all causes of death was evaluated. Results-Serum urea nitrogen concentrations were significantly lower and blood bicarbonate concentrations were significantly higher in the renal diet group at baseline and during the 12- and 24-month intervals. Significant differences were not detected in body weight; Hct; urine protein-to-creatinine ratio; and serum creatinine, potassium, calcium, and parathyroid hormone concentrations. A significantly greater percentage of cats fed the maintenance diet had uremic episodes (26%), compared with cats fed the renal diet (0%). A significant reduction in renal-related deaths but not all causes of death was detected in cats fed the renal diet. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-The renal diet evaluated in this study was superior to an adult maintenance diet in minimizing uremic episodes and renalrelated deaths in cats with spontaneous stage 2 or 3 CKD. SN - 0003-1488 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16978113/Clinical_evaluation_of_dietary_modification_for_treatment_of_spontaneous_chronic_kidney_disease_in_cats_ L2 - http://avmajournals.avma.org/doi/full/10.2460/javma.229.6.949?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -