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Lack of correlation of degree of villous atrophy with severity of clinical presentation of coeliac disease.
Dig Liver Dis. 2007 Jan; 39(1):26-9; discussion 30-2.DL

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIM

Both the clinical presentation and the degree of mucosal damage in coeliac disease vary greatly. In view of conflicting information as to whether the mode of presentation correlates with the degree of villous atrophy, we reviewed a large cohort of patients with coeliac disease.

PATIENTS AND METHODS

We correlated mode of presentation (classical, diarrhoea predominant or atypical/silent) with histology of duodenal biopsies and examined their trends over time.

RESULTS

The cohort consisted of 499 adults, mean age 44.1 years, 68% females. The majority had silent coeliac disease (56%) and total villous atrophy (65%). There was no correlation of mode of presentation with the degree of villous atrophy (p=0.25). Sixty-eight percent of females and 58% of males had a severe villous atrophy (p=0.052). There was a significant trend over time for a greater proportion of patients presenting as atypical/silent coeliac disease and having partial villous atrophy, though the majority still had total villous atrophy.

CONCLUSIONS

Among our patients the degree of villous atrophy in duodenal biopsies did not correlate with the mode of presentation, indicating that factors other than the degree of villous atrophy must account for diarrhoea in coeliac disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Pediatrics and Pathology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY 10032, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16982222

Citation

Brar, P, et al. "Lack of Correlation of Degree of Villous Atrophy With Severity of Clinical Presentation of Coeliac Disease." Digestive and Liver Disease : Official Journal of the Italian Society of Gastroenterology and the Italian Association for the Study of the Liver, vol. 39, no. 1, 2007, pp. 26-9; discussion 30-2.
Brar P, Kwon GY, Egbuna II, et al. Lack of correlation of degree of villous atrophy with severity of clinical presentation of coeliac disease. Dig Liver Dis. 2007;39(1):26-9; discussion 30-2.
Brar, P., Kwon, G. Y., Egbuna, I. I., Holleran, S., Ramakrishnan, R., Bhagat, G., & Green, P. H. (2007). Lack of correlation of degree of villous atrophy with severity of clinical presentation of coeliac disease. Digestive and Liver Disease : Official Journal of the Italian Society of Gastroenterology and the Italian Association for the Study of the Liver, 39(1), 26-9; discussion 30-2.
Brar P, et al. Lack of Correlation of Degree of Villous Atrophy With Severity of Clinical Presentation of Coeliac Disease. Dig Liver Dis. 2007;39(1):26-9; discussion 30-2. PubMed PMID: 16982222.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lack of correlation of degree of villous atrophy with severity of clinical presentation of coeliac disease. AU - Brar,P, AU - Kwon,G Y, AU - Egbuna,I I, AU - Holleran,S, AU - Ramakrishnan,R, AU - Bhagat,G, AU - Green,P H R, Y1 - 2006/09/18/ PY - 2006/03/28/received PY - 2006/07/10/revised PY - 2006/07/26/accepted PY - 2006/9/20/pubmed PY - 2007/4/21/medline PY - 2006/9/20/entrez SP - 26-9; discussion 30-2 JF - Digestive and liver disease : official journal of the Italian Society of Gastroenterology and the Italian Association for the Study of the Liver JO - Dig Liver Dis VL - 39 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND AND AIM: Both the clinical presentation and the degree of mucosal damage in coeliac disease vary greatly. In view of conflicting information as to whether the mode of presentation correlates with the degree of villous atrophy, we reviewed a large cohort of patients with coeliac disease. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We correlated mode of presentation (classical, diarrhoea predominant or atypical/silent) with histology of duodenal biopsies and examined their trends over time. RESULTS: The cohort consisted of 499 adults, mean age 44.1 years, 68% females. The majority had silent coeliac disease (56%) and total villous atrophy (65%). There was no correlation of mode of presentation with the degree of villous atrophy (p=0.25). Sixty-eight percent of females and 58% of males had a severe villous atrophy (p=0.052). There was a significant trend over time for a greater proportion of patients presenting as atypical/silent coeliac disease and having partial villous atrophy, though the majority still had total villous atrophy. CONCLUSIONS: Among our patients the degree of villous atrophy in duodenal biopsies did not correlate with the mode of presentation, indicating that factors other than the degree of villous atrophy must account for diarrhoea in coeliac disease. SN - 1590-8658 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16982222/Lack_of_correlation_of_degree_of_villous_atrophy_with_severity_of_clinical_presentation_of_coeliac_disease_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -