Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Effect of sublingual application of cannabinoids on intraocular pressure: a pilot study.
J Glaucoma 2006; 15(5):349-53JG

Abstract

PURPOSE

The purpose of this study was to assess the effect on intraocular pressure (IOP) and the safety and tolerability of oromucosal administration of a low dose of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta-9-THC) and cannabidiol (CBD).

PATIENTS AND METHODS

A randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled, 4 way crossover study was conducted at a single center, using cannabis-based medicinal extract of Delta-9-THC and CBD. Six patients with ocular hypertension or early primary open angle glaucoma received a single sublingual dose at 8 AM of 5 mg Delta-9-THC, 20 mg CBD, 40 mg CBD, or placebo. Main outcome measure was IOP. Secondary outcomes included visual acuity, vital signs, and psychotropic effects.

RESULTS

Two hours after sublingual administration of 5 mg Delta-9-THC, the IOP was significantly lower than after placebo (23.5 mm Hg vs. 27.3 mm Hg, P=0.026). The IOP returned to baseline level after the 4-hour IOP measurement. CBD administration did not reduce the IOP at any time. However, the higher dose of CBD (40 mg) produced a transient elevation of IOP at 4 hours after administration, from 23.2 to 25.9 mm Hg (P=0.028). Vital signs and visual acuity were not significantly changed. One patient experienced a transient and mild paniclike reaction after Delta-9-THC administration.

CONCLUSIONS

A single 5 mg sublingual dose of Delta-9-THC reduced the IOP temporarily and was well tolerated by most patients. Sublingual administration of 20 mg CBD did not reduce IOP, whereas 40 mg CBD produced a transient increase IOP rise.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Ophthalmology, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Institute of Medical Sciences, University of Aberdeen, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16988594

Citation

Tomida, Ileana, et al. "Effect of Sublingual Application of Cannabinoids On Intraocular Pressure: a Pilot Study." Journal of Glaucoma, vol. 15, no. 5, 2006, pp. 349-53.
Tomida I, Azuara-Blanco A, House H, et al. Effect of sublingual application of cannabinoids on intraocular pressure: a pilot study. J Glaucoma. 2006;15(5):349-53.
Tomida, I., Azuara-Blanco, A., House, H., Flint, M., Pertwee, R. G., & Robson, P. J. (2006). Effect of sublingual application of cannabinoids on intraocular pressure: a pilot study. Journal of Glaucoma, 15(5), pp. 349-53.
Tomida I, et al. Effect of Sublingual Application of Cannabinoids On Intraocular Pressure: a Pilot Study. J Glaucoma. 2006;15(5):349-53. PubMed PMID: 16988594.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of sublingual application of cannabinoids on intraocular pressure: a pilot study. AU - Tomida,Ileana, AU - Azuara-Blanco,Augusto, AU - House,Heather, AU - Flint,Maggie, AU - Pertwee,Roger G, AU - Robson,Philip J, PY - 2006/9/22/pubmed PY - 2006/12/9/medline PY - 2006/9/22/entrez SP - 349 EP - 53 JF - Journal of glaucoma JO - J. Glaucoma VL - 15 IS - 5 N2 - PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to assess the effect on intraocular pressure (IOP) and the safety and tolerability of oromucosal administration of a low dose of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta-9-THC) and cannabidiol (CBD). PATIENTS AND METHODS: A randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled, 4 way crossover study was conducted at a single center, using cannabis-based medicinal extract of Delta-9-THC and CBD. Six patients with ocular hypertension or early primary open angle glaucoma received a single sublingual dose at 8 AM of 5 mg Delta-9-THC, 20 mg CBD, 40 mg CBD, or placebo. Main outcome measure was IOP. Secondary outcomes included visual acuity, vital signs, and psychotropic effects. RESULTS: Two hours after sublingual administration of 5 mg Delta-9-THC, the IOP was significantly lower than after placebo (23.5 mm Hg vs. 27.3 mm Hg, P=0.026). The IOP returned to baseline level after the 4-hour IOP measurement. CBD administration did not reduce the IOP at any time. However, the higher dose of CBD (40 mg) produced a transient elevation of IOP at 4 hours after administration, from 23.2 to 25.9 mm Hg (P=0.028). Vital signs and visual acuity were not significantly changed. One patient experienced a transient and mild paniclike reaction after Delta-9-THC administration. CONCLUSIONS: A single 5 mg sublingual dose of Delta-9-THC reduced the IOP temporarily and was well tolerated by most patients. Sublingual administration of 20 mg CBD did not reduce IOP, whereas 40 mg CBD produced a transient increase IOP rise. SN - 1057-0829 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16988594/Effect_of_sublingual_application_of_cannabinoids_on_intraocular_pressure:_a_pilot_study_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=16988594 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -