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Changing children's intergroup attitudes toward refugees: testing different models of extended contact.
Child Dev. 2006 Sep-Oct; 77(5):1208-19.CD

Abstract

The present research evaluated an intervention, derived from the "extended contact hypothesis," which aimed to change children's intergroup attitudes toward refugees. The study (n=253) tested 3 models of extended contact among 5- to 11-year-old children: dual identity, common ingroup identity, and decategorization. Children read friendship stories based upon these models featuring in- and outgroup members. Outgroup attitudes were significantly more positive in the extended contact conditions, compared with the control, and this was mediated by "inclusion of other in self." The dual identity intervention was the most effective extended contact model at improving outgroup attitudes. The effect of condition on outgroup intended behavior was moderated by subgroup identity. Implications for theoretically based prejudice-reduction interventions among children are discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Kent, Canterbury, UK. L.Cameron@kent.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

16999793

Citation

Cameron, Lindsey, et al. "Changing Children's Intergroup Attitudes Toward Refugees: Testing Different Models of Extended Contact." Child Development, vol. 77, no. 5, 2006, pp. 1208-19.
Cameron L, Rutland A, Brown R, et al. Changing children's intergroup attitudes toward refugees: testing different models of extended contact. Child Dev. 2006;77(5):1208-19.
Cameron, L., Rutland, A., Brown, R., & Douch, R. (2006). Changing children's intergroup attitudes toward refugees: testing different models of extended contact. Child Development, 77(5), 1208-19.
Cameron L, et al. Changing Children's Intergroup Attitudes Toward Refugees: Testing Different Models of Extended Contact. Child Dev. 2006 Sep-Oct;77(5):1208-19. PubMed PMID: 16999793.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Changing children's intergroup attitudes toward refugees: testing different models of extended contact. AU - Cameron,Lindsey, AU - Rutland,Adam, AU - Brown,Rupert, AU - Douch,Rebecca, PY - 2006/9/27/pubmed PY - 2007/1/11/medline PY - 2006/9/27/entrez SP - 1208 EP - 19 JF - Child development JO - Child Dev VL - 77 IS - 5 N2 - The present research evaluated an intervention, derived from the "extended contact hypothesis," which aimed to change children's intergroup attitudes toward refugees. The study (n=253) tested 3 models of extended contact among 5- to 11-year-old children: dual identity, common ingroup identity, and decategorization. Children read friendship stories based upon these models featuring in- and outgroup members. Outgroup attitudes were significantly more positive in the extended contact conditions, compared with the control, and this was mediated by "inclusion of other in self." The dual identity intervention was the most effective extended contact model at improving outgroup attitudes. The effect of condition on outgroup intended behavior was moderated by subgroup identity. Implications for theoretically based prejudice-reduction interventions among children are discussed. SN - 0009-3920 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/16999793/Changing_children's_intergroup_attitudes_toward_refugees:_testing_different_models_of_extended_contact_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2006.00929.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -