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A novel dysphagia diet improves the nutrient intake of institutionalized elders.
J Am Diet Assoc. 2006 Oct; 106(10):1614-23.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Dysphagia affects 35% to 60% of the institutionalized elderly population. This study aimed at evaluating the nutrient intake of frail institutionalized elderly persons with dysphagia and to assess the impact of Sainte-Anne's Hospital Advanced Nutritional Care program on dietary intake and weight.

DESIGN

A 12-week intervention study.

SUBJECTS/SETTING

Ninety-three individuals residing in a Montreal, Canada, long-term care facility who were aged at least 65 years were evaluated. Seventeen subjects with a body mass index (BMI; calculated as kg/m(2)) <24 or weight loss >7.5% within 3 months and with dysphagia were included.

INTERVENTION

The treated group (n=8; aged 82.5+/-4.41 years, weight 55.9+/-12.1 kg, BMI 22.4+/-3.93) received Sainte-Anne's Hospital reshaped minced- or pureed-texture foods with thickened beverages where required. The control group (n=9; aged 84.6+/-3.81 years, weight 54.3+/-7.49 kg, BMI 21.2+/-2.31) maintained traditional nourishment.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Macronutrient and micronutrient intake, weight, and BMI were measured at baseline, 6 weeks, and 12 weeks.

STATISTICS

Student t tests were performed to evaluate change within and between groups.

RESULTS

The treatment and control groups were similar at baseline, having a mean age of 82.5+/-4.41 years vs 84.6+/-3.81 years and BMI of 22.4+/-3.93 vs 21.2+/-2.31, respectively. The average weight in the treated group increased compared to the control group (3.90+/-2.30 vs -0.79+/-4.18 kg; P=0.02). Similarly, the treated group presented an increased intake of energy, proteins, fats, total saturated fats, monounsaturated fats, potassium, magnesium, calcium, phosphorus, zinc, vitamin B-2, and vitamin D compared to control subjects (P<0.05).

CONCLUSION

Institutionalized elderly patients with dysphagia can eat better and increase body weight via a diversified, modified in texture, and appealing oral diet that meets their nutrition needs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Sainte-Anne's Hospital, Veterans Affairs Canada, Sainte-Anne de Bellevue, Québec, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17000194

Citation

Germain, Isabelle, et al. "A Novel Dysphagia Diet Improves the Nutrient Intake of Institutionalized Elders." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 106, no. 10, 2006, pp. 1614-23.
Germain I, Dufresne T, Gray-Donald K. A novel dysphagia diet improves the nutrient intake of institutionalized elders. J Am Diet Assoc. 2006;106(10):1614-23.
Germain, I., Dufresne, T., & Gray-Donald, K. (2006). A novel dysphagia diet improves the nutrient intake of institutionalized elders. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 106(10), 1614-23.
Germain I, Dufresne T, Gray-Donald K. A Novel Dysphagia Diet Improves the Nutrient Intake of Institutionalized Elders. J Am Diet Assoc. 2006;106(10):1614-23. PubMed PMID: 17000194.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A novel dysphagia diet improves the nutrient intake of institutionalized elders. AU - Germain,Isabelle, AU - Dufresne,Thérèse, AU - Gray-Donald,Katherine, PY - 2005/03/10/received PY - 2006/9/27/pubmed PY - 2006/11/11/medline PY - 2006/9/27/entrez SP - 1614 EP - 23 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 106 IS - 10 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Dysphagia affects 35% to 60% of the institutionalized elderly population. This study aimed at evaluating the nutrient intake of frail institutionalized elderly persons with dysphagia and to assess the impact of Sainte-Anne's Hospital Advanced Nutritional Care program on dietary intake and weight. DESIGN: A 12-week intervention study. SUBJECTS/SETTING: Ninety-three individuals residing in a Montreal, Canada, long-term care facility who were aged at least 65 years were evaluated. Seventeen subjects with a body mass index (BMI; calculated as kg/m(2)) <24 or weight loss >7.5% within 3 months and with dysphagia were included. INTERVENTION: The treated group (n=8; aged 82.5+/-4.41 years, weight 55.9+/-12.1 kg, BMI 22.4+/-3.93) received Sainte-Anne's Hospital reshaped minced- or pureed-texture foods with thickened beverages where required. The control group (n=9; aged 84.6+/-3.81 years, weight 54.3+/-7.49 kg, BMI 21.2+/-2.31) maintained traditional nourishment. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Macronutrient and micronutrient intake, weight, and BMI were measured at baseline, 6 weeks, and 12 weeks. STATISTICS: Student t tests were performed to evaluate change within and between groups. RESULTS: The treatment and control groups were similar at baseline, having a mean age of 82.5+/-4.41 years vs 84.6+/-3.81 years and BMI of 22.4+/-3.93 vs 21.2+/-2.31, respectively. The average weight in the treated group increased compared to the control group (3.90+/-2.30 vs -0.79+/-4.18 kg; P=0.02). Similarly, the treated group presented an increased intake of energy, proteins, fats, total saturated fats, monounsaturated fats, potassium, magnesium, calcium, phosphorus, zinc, vitamin B-2, and vitamin D compared to control subjects (P<0.05). CONCLUSION: Institutionalized elderly patients with dysphagia can eat better and increase body weight via a diversified, modified in texture, and appealing oral diet that meets their nutrition needs. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17000194/A_novel_dysphagia_diet_improves_the_nutrient_intake_of_institutionalized_elders_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-8223(06)01696-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -