Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Asymptomatic bacteriuria in adults.

Abstract

A common dilemma in clinical medicine is whether to treat asymptomatic patients who present with bacteria in their urine. There are few scenarios in which antibiotic treatment of asymptomatic bacteruria has been shown to improve patient outcomes. Because of increasing antimicrobial resistance, it is important not to treat patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria unless there is evidence of potential benefit. Women who are pregnant should be screened for asymptomatic bacteriuria in the first trimester and treated, if positive. Treating asymptomatic bacteriuria in patients with diabetes, older persons, patients with or without indwelling catheters, or patients with spinal cord injuries has not been found to improve outcomes.

Links

  • FREE Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Dept of Family Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore 21201, USA. rcolgan@som.umaryland.edu

    , ,

    Source

    American family physician 74:6 2006 Sep 15 pg 985-90

    MeSH

    Adult
    Anti-Infective Agents
    Bacteriuria
    Catheters, Indwelling
    Diabetes Complications
    Female
    Humans
    Male
    Pregnancy
    Pregnancy Complications, Infectious
    Risk Factors
    Spinal Cord Injuries

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    17002033

    Citation

    Colgan, Richard, et al. "Asymptomatic Bacteriuria in Adults." American Family Physician, vol. 74, no. 6, 2006, pp. 985-90.
    Colgan R, Nicolle LE, McGlone A, et al. Asymptomatic bacteriuria in adults. Am Fam Physician. 2006;74(6):985-90.
    Colgan, R., Nicolle, L. E., McGlone, A., & Hooton, T. M. (2006). Asymptomatic bacteriuria in adults. American Family Physician, 74(6), pp. 985-90.
    Colgan R, et al. Asymptomatic Bacteriuria in Adults. Am Fam Physician. 2006 Sep 15;74(6):985-90. PubMed PMID: 17002033.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Asymptomatic bacteriuria in adults. AU - Colgan,Richard, AU - Nicolle,Lindsay E, AU - McGlone,Andrew, AU - Hooton,Thomas M, PY - 2006/9/28/pubmed PY - 2006/10/28/medline PY - 2006/9/28/entrez SP - 985 EP - 90 JF - American family physician JO - Am Fam Physician VL - 74 IS - 6 N2 - A common dilemma in clinical medicine is whether to treat asymptomatic patients who present with bacteria in their urine. There are few scenarios in which antibiotic treatment of asymptomatic bacteruria has been shown to improve patient outcomes. Because of increasing antimicrobial resistance, it is important not to treat patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria unless there is evidence of potential benefit. Women who are pregnant should be screened for asymptomatic bacteriuria in the first trimester and treated, if positive. Treating asymptomatic bacteriuria in patients with diabetes, older persons, patients with or without indwelling catheters, or patients with spinal cord injuries has not been found to improve outcomes. SN - 0002-838X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17002033/Asymptomatic_bacteriuria_in_adults_ L2 - http://www.aafp.org/link_out?pmid=17002033 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -